Tag Archives: turnips

FERMENTED TURNIPS – SUCCESS

POST #778
I opened the fermented turnip jar last night.  What a pleasant surprise.  The taste of the turnips was very interesting (and pleasant!)  I will make this recipe up again, as soon as I finish this jar-full (I think I might add some things, perhaps dill, or garlic — or both- -I actually have an idea of doing 2 or 3 different combinations that would pique my personal taste buds. At the same time, I will make a plain version.)

Personally, I don’t think that this is a “side dish” (I do like sauerkraut as a side dish).  I like the taste, but, as a side dish, I would do a “dab”.  I do think it would be a good addition into any vegetable dish.

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SAUERKRAUT & SAUERRUBEN: fermented cabbage and fermented turnips

POST #768

I’m being good this week. I said I was going to make sauerkraut and sauerruben (fermented turnips), and, indeed, I am doing it.  I think it took me about 4 hours last night to do all the work, but I did.   Part of my impetus was that my half-full jar of sauerkraut (made about 4 weeks ago) fell out of the refrigerator and shattered  — big mess, dead jar, no sauerkraut this week!

Some raw foodists are concerned about fermented foods.  I am on the side of people like Ann Wigmore (pretty much the “mother” of raw food), and others, who think that it is useful to supplement pro-biotics (yes, you could go and buy capsules or powders, but wouldn’t it be nice if you could get the same benefit through your food?)  I use New Life All-Flora probiotics to jumpstart my ferments.  Some people object to fermented foods as “rotten”, but I don’t happen to be one of them.  I understand that, when you ferment raw vegetables, nuts, and seeds, you create a food product that is rich in probiotics and good for you.

I had 2 small-ish heads of cabbage in the refrigerator for 2 weeks.  When I dug them out and cut them in half, I found, interestingly, that the center of each was going bad, while the outside (about 3 inches worth all around the center) was perfectly fine.   I cut away and discarded the centers, and shredded the rest.

STEP BY STEP SAUERKRAUT (no video, just do it)

  • I shredded the cabbage in my wonderful Cuisinart Food Processor.
  • I put all the shredded cabbage in a large bowl, mixed in 1 tablespoon sea salt, and then mooshed/squeezed it all around with my hands, until the cabbage gave up its juice and was reduced in volume by about 1/2.
  • Then I put all of the shredded cabbage and juice into a quart mason jar (I used the wide-mouth funnel of my Champion juicer to get it in neatly), and smooshed it down until there was about 1/2 inch of space above the juice on top of the cabbage.  (The idea is that you want to pack the cabbage very firmly into the jar.  I do it with my fingers — my fist is a little too large to fit inside a quart jar.  The juice rises above the cabbage.  I do this in the sink, because some of the juice -and a little of the cabbage– might seep out.)
  • After I had the cabbage packed into the jar, I emptied 2 capsules of New Chapter All Flora Probiotic Capsules
    into @1 tablespoon of water and mixed well.  Then I poured the probiotic/water mix into the jar, and used a chopstick to make holes down into the cabbage so the probiotics would go down into the cabbage (I don’t know if this is necessary, but it seems logical, so I do it).
  • Then I put the jar in a bowl and set it in a cool corner of my kitchen (cool? ha ha! It is summer in New York City, and we don’t have air-conditioning. Suffice it to say that I put it in the corner of the stove top — we don’t use the stove, anyway.  That is probably the coolest place in the kitchen).  That was about 7  pm last night.

SAUERRUBEN (fermented turnips)

While I was gearing up to make the sauerkraut, I decided to read through Sandor Katz’s book, Wild Fermentation again.  This time, since I had a slew of turnips in the refrigerator, I noticed the “sauerruben” recipe for fermented turnips.  I held back from my irresistible desire to add stuff to a recipe since I’ve never tried to ferment turnips, and since Sandor says that plain fermented turnips are delicious, and I made the straight recipe with just one addition – I added probiotics, which I always add to fermented foods because, when I do,  my product never ever fails.

STEP BY STEP FERMENTED TURNIPS (SAUERRUBEN)  (no video, just do it)

I honestly can’t tell you how many turnips I used.  They were the “Japanese salad turnips” (smallish, all white).  These were medium-sized turnips – large enough to make it worthwhile to peel them.

  • I peeled then chopped the turnips.
  • I shredded the turnips in my food processor
    (with the S blade) (normally when I do turnips, I grind them to a fine texture somewhat similar to applesauce, but this time, I shredded them a little less, to a chunkier texture — but not by much — I hate to chew)
  • I placed the shredded turnips in a large bowl and added 1 tablespoon of sea salt.  I mixed it all around, then squished/mooshed/squeezed all of the turnip/salt mixture, until it yielded a lot of juice and reduced in volume by about half.
  • Then, I placed the turnips in a 1 pint jar.  At first it seemed the turnips would not all fit in, but, after a lot of mooshing/pressing (which I did in the sink, in case of overflow, of which there was some), I got all of the turnips into the 1-pt jar, with a little space at the top.
  • I emptied 2 capsules of New Chapter All-Flora Probiotic
    into @1 tablespoon of water and mixed well.  Then I poured the probiotic/water mix into the jar, and used a chopstick to make holes down into the turnip mix,  so the probiotics would go down into the turnips.
  • Then I put the the 2-part lid  onto the mason jar (I’ve used recycled jars with plain lids, but the two-part lids of the mason jars are traditional, and you do get some feedback if you use them — as the vegetables ferment, some juice seeps out, which lets you know that your product is successful), and I put the jar in a bowl in the coolest corner of the kitchen, beside the sauerkraut jar.

This afternoon, when I came home about 4 pm, I checked the jars, and I was happy to see in that a little less than 24 hours, they had bubbled out about half a bowl-ful of liquid each.  That is a good sign. Actually, I have never seen so much liquid bubble out in one day before — it could be because I used 2 caps of probiotics instead of just one — whatever the cause, I am happy, and I am excited.

I know that my sauerkraut will be ready in 3 days (although I can leave it for longer — I’ve left it for up to 2 weeks.  I suppose I could leave it for longer, but I like the 3-day flavor).

Since this is my first time with fermented turnips, I will go with Sandor’s suggestion of one week of fermentation (although he ferments without probiotics).  I’m sure it will be fine.  (After my first batch, I will understand what I want to do, i.e., what I might like to add, and how long I will need to ferment it.)

After I finish the turnips, I am going to ferment the beets I have in my refrigerator.  I am sure they will work like the turnips, so I will already have something to go on at that time  (I am imagining that I will add garlic and/or something else to beets)  I’m imagining that the beets will turn out to be really delicious.  I can’t wait.

CSA POTLUCK TOMORROW, and I still don’t know what dish I will take

There is a CSA Potluck Dinner tomorrow, coupled with a silent auction. I have donated a malachite and silver necklace and a package of 20 corn crackers with a container of cashew cheez.

Now I need to think about what I will make for my contribution to the potluck. I am really really thinking of bringing a plate worth of the corn crackers and a pot of the cheez, to generate interest in buying the auction item.

Maybe I should make something else as well.

I have several sweet potatoes lying around, and some oranges, some dates, and some raw unsweetened dried coconut. That is the beginning of two possible recipes (I don’t think I want to make my two usual stand-by’s – raw marinated massaged collards, or raw beets/turnips in vinegar– although I do have some beets, some radishes, and some turnips in the refrigerator)

I’m thinking of one of two sweet potato recipes. I like them both because people are surprised when they realize that what they are eating is raw. I don’t know if I would make the whole pie, but I would offer the filling — with all those dates, it is very sweet. I am also thinking about a “stuffing” recipe made with sunflower seeds.

AMAZING SWEET POTATOES
2 – 3 sweet potatoes (or yams)
1 C coconut, dried
2 apples
1/4 C ginger root
4 lemons juiced
2 oranges, juiced
1 C walnuts, chopped fine

• Chop sweet potatoes, apples, and ginger, and run through Champion juicer with ….blank plate. (Alternatively, grate sweet potatoes, apples, and ginger).
• Remove mixtureto a large bowl. Add shredded dried coconut, lemon and orange …juices, and chopped walnuts.
• Mix thoroughly

JUDY’S “JUST LIKE PUMPKIN” PIE
this is most amazing

2 C almonds, soaked
1 C walnuts or pecans, soaked
1 C unsweetened shredded coconut
20 dates, soaked overnight
2 C cashews, soaked overnight, and drained
2 large sweet potatoes, peeled and diced.
3 t pumpkin pie spice
drizzle agave nectar

CRUST
• Combine almonds, walnuts (or pecans, and coconut in food processor or Vitamix, …..and process until ground fine and dough-like
• Pat the dough into two pie plates

FILLING
• Drain dates; reserve soak water.
• In food processor, puree dates, sweet potatoes, and pumpkin pie spice
• Remove mixture from food processor and set aside in a bowl.
• Set mixture aside in a bowl.
• Process cashews, agave nectar, vanilla, and date soak water as needed, until …..smooth and creamy.
• Combine cashew mixture and sweet potato mix puree
• Spread filling in pie shells
• Dehydrate for 6 hours, then refrigerate.

SUNFLOWER SEED DRESSING
1 C sunflower seeds, soaked and drained
1 T flax seeds
1-1/2 C celery
1-1/2 C onion
1-1/4 C red bell pepper
1 T sage to taste (or use Bell’s Poultry Seasoning)
Salt and pepper to taste
Garlic to taste (optional)
1/2 C kalamata olives, chopped fine

• In a food processor, grind soaked sunflower seeds fine.
• Grind flax seeds fine in a coffee grinder.
• Remove ground seeds to a bowl.
• Place all remaining ingredients, save olives, in the food processor, and mince.
• Add olives and combine all ingredients thoroughly.
• Place in a pie tin, or rectangular tin of suitable size and dehydrate for six hours, or until dressing has reached your desired consistency.

No matter what, I need to go to the supermarket.

If I make ‘Amazing Sweet Potatoes” I need lemons.

If I make the sunflower seed dressing, I need the olives.

Oh!! If I make the pie filling, I don’t need anything, and it tastes really good…

What will I choose??? I need to decide in the next half hour. Oops! I’ve just gone for the easy one. Excuse me, I need to go soak the nuts.

7/3/08 CSA SHARE: what I got

Been down so long it looks like up to me!
No, I am not depressed – I just tried to download Windows Media, only I only have Windows 98SE, so my system crashed.  I fretted.  Who has money in my family of me(i.e., me, me, or me) to pay for computer repairs?  Then a nice Facebook friend suggested a fix and… after a lot more fretting… it worked!!!!  Yippeee!!!! (I love you Jose!!!!)

So, anyway, this is what they promised, and this is what I got:
BEETS……………………………….1 bunch
DILL:…………………………. …….1 bunch
ZUCCHINI: ……………………..3
ROUND ZUCCHINI………..1 piece
BABY SALAD TURNIPS….1 bunch
GREEN CRISP LETTUCE…1 head
CARROTS ………………………..1 bunch
CUCUMBERS: ………………….2
LETTUCE MIX. ………………..1 bag

I got some collards, too. (Not listed at the farm website)

I got some collards, too.  They went immediately into massaged collard salad.

Whoops! I thought the cucumbers were zucchini!  (Just too used to zucchini, I guess)

The zucchini go to the spiralizer for “pasta”

The dill went into the dehydrator, because I do not trust myself to use the fresh quickly enough.

Carrot juice.
Beet juice.

My favorite beet salad (food process the beets into a fine grate. Add olive oil, finely chopped fresh garlic, apple cider vinegar, mix all)

Green smoothies with the lettuce and turnips, turnip greens and beet greens, plus some tomatoes, and maybe some fruit.

MY FRUIT SHARE WAS
raspberries and blueberries.
I put all the raspberries into one protein shake.
I put all the blueberries into one protein shake.

WHAT I MADE TONIGHT

I did not have much in the way of fresh food (like NONE) in the house tonight, owing to the fact that, until Thursday, I expected to be on the Master Cleanse for another 3 – 4 weeks.

Still, I was responsible for making a dinner that my SAD diet room-mate would gladly eat. Hmn… Creativity needed>
I do have a number of bags full of vegetables I have dehydrated over the winter, and some leftovers from the summer, so…..

  • I dug out my last little bit of wakame (about 1/2 C) and soaked it.
  • I soaked about 1/2 handful of dehydrated turnip.
  • I ground up about a handful of dehydrated red bell pepper slices.
  • I finely chopped 1/2 onion.
  • I also soaked @ 1/2 C of dehydrated parsnips.
  • I combined the wakame with the turnip and the bell pepper powder, and added some garlic powder, olive oil, and apple cider vinegar.
  • To the parsnips, I added some olive oil and a little black pepper.

That was dinner. I found the wakame salad very filling and satisfying (such an interesting word – you know when you eat something and you *feel* like it is what you needed)
The parsnips were good… like rice…

I am going to take the leftovers to work tomorrow for lunch.

CSA WINTER SHARE: What I Got

Yesterday’s was the third CSA Winter Share delivery, and the first one where I have had enough time to catalog what I got.

In this winter share, we get 25 lbs of vegetables and “some” fruit. It seems to be mostly the same each time, actually. I also get 1/2 gal. of apple cider.

Yesterday I got:
• carrots (lots and lots)
• potatoes (quite a few)
• 6 parsnips
• 2 watermelon radishes
• 2 tiny heads of garlic
• about 10 beets
• 2 turnips
• Maybe 10 lbs of apples and pears

I gave Mrs. Murphy, the elderly lady next door, 4 apples, 3 pears, and maybe half of the potatoes.
She has been saying that she couldn’t eat pears because they aren’t soft enough, and this kind that we got are very soft, to the point that they will die after about 2 days.

The watermelon radishes are kind of interesting. They almost look like turnips – they are white, and they are quite a bit larger than the red radishes you see in the supermarket. The only thing to really distinguish them from turnips is that the tops are green instead of purple. Inside they are red. They do taste radish-y, though.

What does all of this mean, recipe-wise?
Well, Thursday night, I spiralized a turnip, a beet, and a carrot, and added them to some soaked hijiki seaweed, sprinkled some of my dehydrated garlic and onion, some Italian spices, and some Spike, added about a tablespoon of olive oil and another tablespoon of apple cider vinegar, mixed it up well, and let it marinate for about a half hour.
It was good, even though I forgot to add in the radish I had planned to spiralize.

Last night, I ate some more of the mix, but I knew I would not have the heart to eat it a third day in a row, so I decided to see what would happen if I put it in pattie shapes in the dehydrator. I put the mix in the food processor and ground it to applesauce texture,  and then spooned the mixture onto teflex sheets, mashed the lumps in to round patties, and left them to dehydrate for about 6 hours. They weren’t dry enough to flip onto a screen, so I left them for 10 more hours. They turned out crunchy and fishy/meaty tasting, with a slightly bitter tang. I like the taste, so I will take them to work for lunch tomorrow.

That leaves me with all the beets, all the apples and pears, etc.

On Monday I am going to head to the market to see if I can pick up some avocados and onions, to make sushi…. I have nori sheets, and I have heard that parsnips make a credible rice substitute, so I can make sushi (I have some sprouted sunflower seeds I could grind up into a paste if I feel I need some serious protein). I will grate up some carrots and beets and add them, too.

I like to process beets and turnips fine in the food processor and add apple cider vinegar and a little olive oil, so I will probably do that for lunch tomorrow, and throw some of the sunflower sprouts on top, just to see what happens when they sit on apple cider vinegared vegetables for 6 hours.

I will probably end up finely processing the beets and turnips and dehydrating them for later use in salads and smoothies, and as snacks.

I will probably take more potatoes to Mrs. Murphy next week. I know raw potato recipes, but I just never feel like making them. I take that as a sign that they are not good for me. Mrs. Murphy will be happy… she likes mashed potatoes and hashed brown potatoes.

Tomorrow morning, I will process about 6 apples and pears to make apple sauce for breakfast, and I will take what I can’t eat to work for a snack. Tomorrow night, I will probably process about 10 apples and pears to make juice.

The next delivery will be in 3 weeks, so I have plenty of time to figure out how to eat everything. Since this coincides with my rent check, I will have plenty of chances to be creative, since money for any other groceries will be scarce. Perhaps I will learn to make soups. With this many beets, I could probably make borsht.

11-19-07 CSA SHARE: What I got

11-19-2007-csa-share-3.jpg

what they said we would get, vs. what I got

Purple Top Turnips
Brussel Sprouts……….Mystery Leaves
Cabbage
Broccoli
Kale
Carrots
Celeriac
Leeks
Yellow Potatoes
Parsley

Celeriac is something new to me. Someone said I could chop it raw into a salad.