Tag Archives: raw vegan books

CARMELLA’S SUNNY RAW KITCHEN RETURNS!

I’m happy to see that Carmella, of the Sunny Raw Kitchen blog, has come back to us, with a dynamic new website, Carmella’s Sunny Raw Kitchen.  She has some free recipes there, and she is also offering special prices on her books.

CRAZY SEXY KITCHEN: Kris Carr’s great new recipe book

Post #852
I received Kris Carr’s Crazy Sexy Kitchen today. (I have followed Kris Carr pretty much since she started an Internet presence talking about nutrition as a way to overcome cancer, which is one of my interests as a nutrition consultant).

I was pleasantly surprised that this book contains so many interesting raw recipes that I haven’t seen anywhere else (lately, that is my new bellwether: how many times have I seen this idea with one ingredient change, or, is this something new or incredibly innovative?). Even among the cooked recipes, there is often a suggestion as to how to make them raw.

Although the book is co-written by Chad Sarno, a chef in his own wright, a number of other chefs have contributed recipes to it.

Notably, quite a few of the raw recipes look like things I can envision myself putting together in the near future (oh, if you don’t know me, that is pretty much the highest accolade I know how to give to a collection of raw recipes – I am really old school, and, also, a really lazy eater, so, if something looks enticing, and it looks like something that I would be willing to spend time eating, and I think I might actually be willing to put in the time to make it, that wins the blue ribbon). There are also a number of interesting and delicious-looking vegan but non-raw recipes, which would make this a very good book for those who might be transitioning to either a vegan or a raw vegan diet.

Aside from the recipes, one of the things I really liked about this book was the initial sections about food preparation equipment, starting from knife descriptions (this is always my favorite, as my first “food processor” was my beautiful knife, which I still have) and going through just about everything, including dehydrators; and methods for cutting (this is like a mini chef-prep course by itself).

By me, this is one of the best new vegan/raw vegan books out there. Despite my initial reservations, I’m glad I made the leap of faith and got it

FREDERIC PATENAUDE BOOKS: GOOD DEALS HERE and no endless ads

POST #851
Frederic Patenaude books are on amazon.com!

You no longer need to scroll through miles of “but wait! there’s more! Did you know? Do you want to…?”

If you already know what you want, you can go to amazon.com and pick up those books at reasonable prices.

2 CLASSIC RAW FOOD BOOKS & 1 RAWMAZING BOOK

POST #850
I LOVE GETTING NEW BOOKS!  I love books, period, but, when I get more books, I love that more. Today, I received three raw food books that I had ordered while I was away.  Boy oh boy!  Two are for my EARLY RAW FOOD BOOKS collection, and the other one is a book I had never heard of before the author sent me an email the other day.

I am very excited to finally have a copy of what may be the first raw food book published in America (1925), Mrs. Richter’s Cook-Less Book, by Vera Richter.  Vera Richter, together with her husband, Dr. John Richter, opened the first raw food restaurant in Los Angeles, Eutropheon, in 1917, and ran it until the late 1940s.  The book includes recipes for the dishes served in the restaurant. These are recipes from the days before food processors and dehydrators, so they are all quite simple to prepare.(Interestingly, someone has copied this book and made a Kindle version, so, unless you are a fanatic, like me, and must have the original, you can read through it on your Kindle for a highly reasonable price).

I also received a copy of John Tobe’s 1969 Health Giving, Life Saving No-Cook Book, which Raw Chef Dan showed me when I was at his studio a couple of weeks ago.  This is an interesting book – it is not 100% raw, but it does have a lot of good raw recipes (early raw food writers often included non-raw items in their recipe books).  The No-Cook Book would be a very good introduction for people transitioning to a raw diet.

I’ve been reading Susan Powers’ recipes on her Rawmazing site for quite a while, and have used quite a few of them.  The other day, I got an email from her, announcing her book, Rawmazing: Over 130 Simple Raw Recipes for Radiant Health, on Amazon.com for a very accessible price, so I ordered it. Wow! Among the usual re-worked recipes that we see versions of in almost every cookbook, there are some very nice, unique, tasty-sounding recipes in Rawmazing.  One thing I find interesting is that she uses sprouted wheat in a number of recipes –something we don’t usually see in raw recipes books.  I am looking forward to reading through this book more in depth, and, very likely, making some of the recipes.

FERMENTED FOODS: My favorite book: Wild Fermentation

POST #799
Since I’m on a roll with this fermentation thing, I might as well tell you about my favorite book: Wild Fermentation: The Flavor, Nutrition, and Craft of Live-Culture Foods by Sandor Katz.

This is one of the first books on fermentation that I got, and it is still the book I go back to time after time.  It seems that, every time I read through it, I find something new, no matter how often I go through it.

There is background information, info on ways of fermenting, and, also, interesting recipes that I probably will never try, as well as ones I have tried and loved.

For a beginner, or a fermenter who just wants a refresher, or else a refreshing read, this book is fabulous.

RAW VEGAN FERMENTED VEGETABLE RECIPES: Complete Idiot’s Guide to Fermenting Foods

POST #796
I’ve just added another book on fermenting raw vegetables, The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Fermenting Foods, by Wardeh Harmon, to my collection.

As is most often the case with books on fermentation or culturing of foods, this book is not only for raw vegans.  The sections on Vegetables and Fruit, however, are about raw food culturing,  and the majority of the recipes in Non-Alcoholic Beverages, as well as many in the  Condiments  chapter, are also raw.

The first chapters, on the whys and hows,  of fermentation, and the tools to use are very educational.   Although the book recommends using whey (a dairy product) for its lactobacillus content, it also offers a raw vegan option (water kefir), and gives detailed instruction as to how to use the water kefir.  (I will probably just stick with throwing my New Chapter probiotics powder into the mix — it has always worked for me — the only ferment batch I’ve ever lost was the sauerkraut I forgot to put the probiotics in).

The recipes are clear and detailed enough that a neophyte could manage a successful ferment right off the bat.  

I will put this one on my go-to shelf, for sure, especially when I am thinking of trying something new.

7/26/12 CSA SHARE: What we got

POST #767

Basil or Chives – 1 bun…………..Chives
Zucchini – 2 pcs
Cucumbers – 3 pcs
Green Cabbage – 1 hd…………… Savoy Cabbage – 2 sm. hds
Walla Walla Onions – 4 small
Asian Eggplant – 1 sm pc…………traded for 3 cucumbers
Bell Pepper – 1 pc
Green Long Peppers – 3 pcs
Red Potatoes – 1 qt…………………traded for onions

FRUIT SHARE:
Peaches – 1 bag
UFO Peaches – 1 bag

The eggplant was smaller than any of the cucumbers, so I traded it for more cucumbers (I figured it would be too much work on such a small eggplant to make it be a raw food dish)

I finally tired, last year, of trying out raw recipes for potatoes.  I used to give my potatoes to my next-door neighbor, Mrs. Murphy,  but she passed away last month, so I have no use for potatoes now.  I felt lucky to find onions to trade for.

I’ve never tried to make sauerkraut with Savoy cabbage, so I looked it up in Sandor Katz’s  Wild Fermentation: The Flavor, Nutrition, and Craft of Live-Culture Foods , my go-to book for info on raw fermentation, and found that I can use Savoy cabbage just as I would use green cabbage (I’m guessing the flavor might be different, but I’m going to put jalapeno peppers in it, so it will probably be okay).  I’m out of sauerkraut right now, because my jar fell out of the refrigerator and broke all over the floor (big mess!).  While I was reading Wild Fermentation, I noticed a recipe for fermenting turnips, and another for fermenting beets, so… there go my backed up root vegetables.  I have some time tomorrow afternoon, so I guess I’ll make some sauerkraut, and some fermented turnips and beets.

Stay tuned

Ani Phyo’s 15 DAY FAT BLAST

Well, I did finish Ani’s 15-day Fat Blast… I guess we can see that I am not the person to give you day-by-day updates.  I liked it well enough… As I have previously mentioned, I did email Ani Phyo to ask her if I had to do the varied diet, or if I could stick with one thing, i.e., one breakfast smoothie, or one evening soup, etc.  I never received an answer from Ani Phyo (which fact has made me like her much less – always, before, when I have approached a raw vegan book author with questions about the recipes In the book I have bought, they have been very helpful.

Anyway, I just pretty much stayed with the blueberry shake throughout the whole 15 days.  Sometimes I did do a banana shake, and, in the last days, I did a banana-blueberry shake, based on both shakes.

I ate spinach salad until the spinach I’d bought started to wilt. Then I made a big spinach/sauerkraut salad.

I liked the tomato soup, the coconut tomato soup, and the red bell pepper soup, so I stuck with those.

When I was finishing up, I went back and read what Ani Phyo  included after the diet info.  There, I found a lot of the usual – eat what you want to when you want to. Ha!  This seems to me like a disclaimer. You eat what you want to, and you will not get the results promised in the title.

By the middle of the Fat Blast, I found I needed to add a laxative tea at night.  Things just weren’t moving through. I was eating things which were suggested, and I was using a blender, as opposed to a juicer, but needed some additional help to perform my morning ablutions.

I am happy to tell you that I came down  to suing two or three of the shakes pretty much exclusively. 1    I found that the blueberry shake, and the banana shake worked well for me throughout the diet. A big reason there was finances.I just really didn’t have enough money to add in all of those lovely ideas that are suggested in the program.

Regardless, I did stick with the *idea* of the program, and I did lose at least one size (I don’t have a scale, so I can’t tell you what the 9weight equivalent was – I just got into my jeans and did not have to hold my breath to close them. I was able to put on a couple of dresses and not look like I was selling something.  In one case, I was able to wear a dress I’d received as a gift, for the first time. Whoopee!

Since I am a veteran Master Cleanser, the whole time I was going through this Fat Blast, I felt a strong desire to do the salt cleanse.  I think that was why I finally went to the laxative tea in the last days. I avoided using laxatives or the salt cleanse during the first part of the diet because I wanted to know how the diet worked.  My experience, in the end, was that I needed a little more excitement to move me, so I finally resorted  to the laxative tea.

Should you do this diet?  I’d say yes. If you have enough money to eat all the things on the diet, it will be fun (all of the recipes are easy to prepare).  If you adhere even moderately strictly to this diet, you will lose at least 15 pounds.

RAW FOR THE HOLIDAYS: raw holiday recipes from Raw Food Rehab

POST #716
Penni  Shelton, the woman behind Raw Food Rehab, one of the best sites out there, is once again offering her raw for Raw for the Holidays ebook.  This book has a wonderful collection of delicious recipes.  You can’t go wrong here.

ANI PHYO’S LATEST BOOK: Ani’s Raw Food Essentials

I have just received my copy of Ani Phyo’s new book, Ani’s Raw Food Essentials: Recipes and Techniques for Mastering the Art of Live Food, and boy am I excited. I had seen this book on-line, and, last Friday I had a chance to browse through it in a bookstore, and knew I had chosen another winner.

There are lots of new recipes in this book. In fact, most of the recipes  are new (although there are a few of the staples which are used as base ingredients  in many of Ani Phyo’s recipes)

I am looking forward to digging into this book and trying out new recipes.  I haven’t bought a new recipe book in over a year (I’m too picky, I think, and, anyway, my old books going back to the 60s and 70s still work).  I really love Ani Phyo’s recipes, and the ideas she sprinkles throughout her books.