Tag Archives: raw recipe books

SOMEBODY BEAT ME TO THE PUNCH!

For years, I’ve been grumbling and saying that I should write a book with recipes which require no fancier equipment than a food processor, and, maybe a blender. I had collected numbers of raw vegan books, and annotated them as to what equipment was required, so that I could avoid the things that I believe can be done without. (Don’t get me wrong: in the past I have had all of the exciting stuff: I scrimped and saved to get the $450 for a Vitamix which came with a 7-year warranty, and gave up the ghost about 3 weeks after the warranty was up. I also had a dehydrator, however, in my situation, it is not convenient to use it, so it is peacefully resting in storage.) That leaves me with a low-end food processor, and a Nutri-Bullet that my mother gave me,

I became a raw vegan when I was in college (like, maybe, 47 years ago). Back then, things were all simple: slice this up, chop this up: have food.

So, what am I talking about? I recently found this book Raw & Simple by Judita Wignall, and I am mad as a hornet that I did not put my book out when I first thought about it. This is a very nice book, and I am as pleased as can be that someone has done what I have failed to get around to doing,

This book has lots of interesting and tasty recipes, and none of them require anything more complicated than a food processor.

So, if you want “kind of” fancy, but you don’t have a lot of equipment, this is definitely for you. (If you already have all the fancy equipment anyone could dream of, this will still be a welcome addition to your recipe-book library.

GORILLA FOOD: great new recipe book – my new favorite!

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Was POST #901
I was very interested to receive this copy of Gorilla Food, by Aaron Ash, of the Vancouver restaurant by the same name.  Oh, this book is nice! Enticing new flavor ideas, fresh innovative recipes, pretty pictures – oh my! Get this book here

This is a recipe book – you asked for raw recipes and here they are. After a two page introduction, which tells the curious how the Gorilla Foods restaurant in Vancouver, BC, Canada came into being, and shows a picture pictures of a 1960s-throwback-looking space, it launches into a clarification of terms and descriptions of the appliances and tools needed to work the magic, as well as a shopping list, i.e., all of the ingredients which will be eventually called for in the recipes.

After that come the recipes. Now, if you like more or less “instant food” (not much more than a food processor involved), and don’t like to plan a day or two in advance, many of these recipes will not work for you as they are written (many require dehydration, or include dehydrated recipes detailed on other pages), but, often, the “raw” parts, i.e., the parts before you dehydrate, are good enough on their own – for example, although the Morning Curry Crepes call for the dehydrated Ginger Tomato Crepe,  recipe would be just as good sitting in a bowl for you to spoon up.  So it goes… I see this book as requiring a bit of creativity if you are to get the most from it – just about every page has something exciting, mouthwatering, or really curious.

That said, there are some truly innovative (as in: I haven’t seen this before) recipes for vegetable mixes, sauces, cheezes, condiments, crackers/breads/wraps/chips, and desserts. If you take the often unique vegetable mix ideas, and start adding different sauces, you get altogether different and exciting experiences. If you are willing to do the dehydrated breads/crackers/chips/wraps (which you can do in advance and freeze – you knew that, right?), you expand your options exponentially

When you get to the desserts in Gorilla Food, you will start to drool. Many of the desserts just involve combining the ingredients, and voila! Of course, the really fancy-looking ones in the pictures  the use of a dehydrator, but, often, the ingredients will taste good without the dehydrator, and just will be more like goo, or something you have to eat with a spoon.

There! I’ve just taken apart Gorilla Food and digested it into a recipe book for people who only have a knife, or, at best, a food processor. You can make almost all of these things (save the breads, the chips, the crackers) in a beginner raw food kitchen.

If you are a beginner, if you are an old hand, Gorilla Food will be worth your while.  So, do check out Gorilla Food. It is so very fanciful, and just this side of very basic raw food (which you don’t see much in recipe books anymore), with a kick!

You can get this book here