Tag Archives: raw foods

POST #776
This is what they said, and what we got:

 GOT                                               TRADED FOR

Swiss Chard – 1 bun……………….1 hd cabbage

Red Potatoes – 3 lb bag…………….5 cucumbers

Cucumbers – 3-4 pcs

Genovese Basil – 1 bun

Green Cabbage – 1 hd

Fresh Yellow Onions – 1 bun

Sungold Cherry Tomatoes

Green Beans – 1 bag

Red Tomatoes – 3 lb

 As I mentioned in my last post, I was in a serious time-squeeze this afternoon.  I was working with a private student until 4pm – fortunately, she didn’t have any extra questions right at the end.  I flew out of the building by 4:05, made it to the subway station at @4:10, and, fortunately, a train pulled in right after I had reached my standing spot.  Made it to the community center where we pick up by 4:45.  (Play the Lone Ranger Suite).  Got my box, looked inside, went over to the trade box, saw the cabbage, grabbed it, went back to my box to get the chard, and back to the trade box to deposit it. Back to my box, baggy-ing everything as I took it out of the box (as I always do – makes it easier when I get home) Switched out the small cabbage for a larger one, and traded the potatoes for 5 cucumbers. 

All that took me about 15 minutes, and then I was on the run to my apartment, drop off the goods.  Made it to the apartment in 5, dropped the bags in the kitchen, changed clothes, and was back out on the way to the subway by 4:15.  YES!!!

Ate all of the cherry tomatoes on the train back to work.

That basil is pretty interesting looking.  The leaves are about as big as baby spinach leaves.

The cucumbers are quite large.  I’ve got about 10.  I can eat some of them, but I’m thinking of cutting up maybe half of them and trying out a raw sour pickle recipe.

With the cabbage, I’m going to make up a garlic dill jar, and then maybe a “kimchee flavor” jar (using kimchee spices with regular cabbage). 

The tomatoes?  Well, it’s summer… Mix some with cucumbers and onions for a salad, chop up some more and mix them into whatever piques my fancy (I’m still low on fancy and eating desire – got into those coral silk pants I bought 2 years ago, at last!)

I do want to get up to Fairway and pick up some cashews and almonds so I can make up some pates. 

 I’m thinking of making up a couple of batches of crackers, since I seem to be on a “fast food” diet tangent.  If I have crackers, I can put stuff on top of them and eat easy.

 

8/2/12 CSA SHARE: What we got

POST #772
Here is what we got:
Toscano Kale – 1 bun……………………2 med eggplant
Cucumbers – several pcs………………..2 cucumbers
Fennel – 1 hd……………………………….2 sm hds
Fresh Yellow  or Walla Walla Onions – 1 bun…..about 6 med.
Baby Watermelon – 1 pc
Bell Pepper – 1 pc
Green Long Peppers – several pcs
Red Tomatoes OR Sungold Cherry Tomatoes – 2 sm

No kale! Oh well!  I traded the eggplants I got instead for another watermelon.  (I have some good raw vegan eggplant recipes, but I just don’t feel like doing that much work)

I would have liked to trade away the fennel, but there wasn’t anything else to trade for, and some helpful volunteers suggested a fennel and orange salad (something I wouldn’t think of, because I don’t normally put fruit with vegetables – except, of course, with tomatoes)

I also got a bag of regular peaches and another bag of UFO peaches

DAIKON CHEEZE BITES

DAIKON CHEEZ BITES

Leftover cashew cheddar cheeze
Daikon slices about 2 inches wide and 3 – 4 inches long.

  • Arrange the daikon slices close to one another on a teflex sheet-covered dehydrator tray.
  • Spread a spoonful or so of the cheez on each daikon slice.
  • Dehydrate for 6 hours or so at 100 degrees.
    Check the slices for dryness. If not completely dry, put them back into the dehydrator and continue to dehydrate until they are completely dry.
  • When the cheez bites are completely dry, remove from the dehydrator, peel the daikon bites from the teflex, eat some, and store the rest in a tightly sealed container in the refrigerator.

ARE THE OATS YOU ARE BUYING RAW?

The subject of the rawness of steel-cut oats  recently came up on the frugalraw mailing list .  It got me thinking, and I ended up spending a couple of hours roaming the Internet and learning quite a bit about oats, commercial oat production, oat farming, and oat sprouting.

As much of what I learned was eye-opening, I’ve decided to include the results of my research here, in an expanded form of my original post to the mailing list.

Are steel cut oats raw? Good question!  I googled oats and steel cut oats, and found that most sources tend to pussy-foot around the issue.

Wikipedia states that hulled oats ” pass through a heat and moisture treatment to balance moisture, but mainly to stabilize the groat. Oat groats are high in fat (lipids) and once exposed from their protective hull, enzymatic (lipase) activity begins to break down the fat into free fatty acids, ultimately causing an off flavor or rancidity. Oats will begin to show signs of enzymatic rancidity within 4 days of being dehulled and not stabilized. This process is primarily done in food grade plants, not in feed grade plants. An oat groat is not considered a raw oat groat if it has gone through this process: the heat has disrupted the germ, and the oat groat will not sprout.”

Does this mean that oat groats and steel-cut oats which are sold as food products raw or not?

Wisegeek.com says “Just as with all types of prepared oats, steel cut oats are made from oat grains that have been hulled and steamed. Generally the finished oat groats that are destined for preparation as steel cut oats are also roasted, helping to release an enhanced flavor in the oat groats.”

Companies which produce and package oats and steel cut oats do not say that their oats are a raw product.  The closest that any such company comes, per my research, is McCann’s claim that other companies’ oats undergo extensive heat processing, which affects the flavor.  McCann’s does not state, however, that their product is *not heat processed*)

Bob’s Red Mill, which offers both flax seed meal (known to go rancid quickly) and steel-cut oats, cautions consumers to keep the flax meal refrigerated for freshness, but does not offer similar advice for its steel-cut oats (what does this say?)

Sprouthouse.com lists “Oat Groats Raw Organic” but says “These are NOT oats for oat grass.”  (and why not?  This statement does beg the question.)

Sproutpeople.com lists oats for growing oatgrass “these are the same seeds we sell for Oat Sprouts.  Hulless Oats do not usually grow a great crop of grass.”  Under the sproutpeople.com listing for sprouting seed, “hulless Nebraska oats” are listed as “Hulless, tender and very quick to sprout. These are a wonderfully tender grain with a mild sweetness. Raw, not cooked, not heated, not hulled.”  The claim is very clear, here, however confusing — if these oats are not hulled, how are they hulless?

The question of how those Nebraska oats got to be hulless is answered, at length, in Katherine Czapp’s article “Naked Oats”, on the Weston A. Price Foundation site , which suggests that “hulless oats” (avena nuda, as opposed to the more common avena sativa) were once commonly grown in America:

“Naked oats, so called because the kernels thresh free of the hulls, have been grown for centuries ….can also be easily used as porridge or other food for humans.

The nutrition profile of naked oats is quite impressive, with contributions rich in minerals and vitamins and a fat content rivaling that of corn, along with high-quality protein similar to that found in soybeans…… Naked oats also supply unsaturated fatty acids that contribute to the production of higher quality eggs, milk and meat products.”

This article also tells us that early colonists  grew “silpee”, also known as “pilcorn” and “peelcorn” (avena nuda), which they sometimes referred to as “corn,” both to feed their livestock and to make the traditional Scottish porridge “sowens.”

Seedsofchange.com, an on-line organic seed supplier, says of its avena nuda  (listed as hulless oats) “produces oats without a thick hull, easy process [sic]  for home use. ”

TO MAKE A LONG STORY SHORT:  If your steel-cut oats have been made from “naked oats”, then they may well be raw.  If the oat groats you buy are from “naked oats”, then they may well be raw.  Pointedly ask your supplier/food market if the oats you are interested in buying can be sprouted.   If your oats are from “avena sativa”, the most commonly available oats in America and Europe, their rawness must be suspect. If this concerns you, you should track down the producer and pin them down to a specific yes/no answer on the question of heat-processing.

My New Year’s Plans

The black-eyed pea sprouts are in the refrigerator! I started them Saturday night, and they just grew like nobody’s business. I thought that I would have time to get them last night, but they had already gotten longer than the bean. (It seems to me I remember that they are supposed to taste better if they are only bean length) Whatever! Last night I scooped about a cup of them into a bowl, added about 1 t apple cider vinegar, 1 T extra virgin olive oil, 1 chopped up campari tomato, 2 T minced onion, and some of my dehydrated garlic powder, and left them to marinate (I wasn’t sure you can marinate sprouts, but I figured it was worth a try. I ate them about an hour later. Yum! Yes, marinating works on sprouts.

I also started some wheat sprouts for rejuvelac on Saturday night. Yesterday morning, I began to despair that the wheat would ever sprout, but this morning there were the littlest sprouts showing. When I got home, the sprouts were almost the length of the wheat berriestime to stop them and make the rejuvelac.

My plan for the New Year is to start a Master Cleanse on the night of January 1st – I have to eat my black eyed peas and collards on January First without fail, so I will start that night.
I don’t know what I will do with this rejuvelac I am making – I did not take that into account when I was doing my planning. Maybe I will drink some along with the Master Cleanse and see how that works. We’ll see. I do not know anyone who does rejuvelac, or I would give it to them.

Getting Ready for New Year’s

I went out today and go the supplies to make my little New Year’s celebration.  I’m planning to spend time alone on New Year’s Eve.  I don’t get a lot of quite time alone, but my room-mate is in Japan with her family, so I am going to luxuriate in the quiet.  I may even take a bubble bath…

Tonight, I have started some rejuvelac wine to celebrate.  I don’t know that I am going to make champagne rejuvelac this year. I’ll decide tomorrow when I start the rejuvelac.

I have also started soaking some black-eyed peas to sprout for my traditional good-luck black-eyed peas on New Year’s Day.  I also have a small bunch of collards which I will prepare on New Year’s Eve and let marinate until New Year’s Day.

I’ve also laid in 10 nice big lemons, some sea salt, a jug of Grade B organic maple syrup, and some herbal laxative tea, so I can begin my Master Cleanse on New Year’s night — I think it is better to go ahead with my traditional New Year’s good luck meal, and then get started with the Master Cleanse.  (I have heard of a powder that you can use for the Master Cleanse, and, when I run out lemons, I may buy it and see how it works– that is still up in the air– I have enough lemons for most of the first 10 days.

NEW YEAR’s RECIPES (with raw food you need to plan ahead…)

Where I am from in the South, traditionally, we eat black-eyed peas, collards (or other greens, like kale), and pork, on New Year’s Day.
The collards are green, like money, and symbolize prosperity in the New Year. The black-eyed peas symbolize good luck, and the pork also symbolizes prosperity (because the pig is the only animal which eats while it is moving forward)

I don’t eat pork, duh, but I do keep up the tradition of greens and black-eyed peas.

BLACK-EYED PEAS
1 C dried organic black-eyed peas
1 – 2 T minced onion (to taste, optional)
1 – 2 T minced garlic (to taste, optional)
1 – 2 T extra virgin olive oil (to taste)
1 – 2 T apple cider vinegar (to taste)
sea salt to taste
black pepper to taste (optional)

Sprout black-eyed peas for 3 – 4 days (soak for 12 hours,
drain, and sprout, rinsing twice daily for 2 – 3 – 1/2 more days)
Mix sprouted black-eyed peas with minced onion and a minced garlic to taste (optional).
Add olive oil and vinegar, and mix well.
Add salt and pepper to taste.

You can also find these COLLARDS RECIPES elsewhere within blog. They are re-listed here for your convenience.

MARINATED GREENS
MARINADE
1/4 C apple cider vinegar
1/4 C sun-dried tomatoes, finely chopped
1/4 C scallions, white parts only, finely only
1 clove garlic, minced
1 t red pepper flakes
2 t sea salt, divided
1/2 t black pepper
1 bunch collard greens (or other greens)
1/8 C olive oil

1 – Mix apple cider vinegar, sun-dried tomatoes, scallions, garlic, red pepper flakes, 1 t sea salt and pepper. Set aside.
1 – Roll up 2 – 3 leaves into a cylindrical “cigar” shape.
2 – With a sharp knife, thinly slice the rolled greens crosswise into ribbons.
3 – Cross-chop the “rounds”
4 – Place in a large bowl.
5 – Repeat steps 1 – 4 until all greens have been chopped.
6 – Add in olive oil, remaining 1 t salt, and marinade mixture.
7 -Massage all ingredients until mass is reduced by half.
8 -Refrigerate and marinate for 1 – 24 hours

MASSAGED MARINATED GREENS
this comes out enough like old-fashioned Southern greens to satisfy your longing for Grandmamma’s cooking.

1 bunch greens (collards, kale, beet, turnip)
5 – 10 kalamata olives, finely chopped
2 T apple cider vinegar
2 T extra virgin olive oil
1 onion, finely chopped
1/2 red bell pepper, slivered
fresh garlic, finely chopped, to taste, or garlic powder (optional)
chili seasoning, to taste (optional)

1 – Roll up 2 – 3 leaves into a cylindrical “cigar” shape.
2 – With a sharp knife, thinly slice the rolled greens crosswise into ribbons.
3 – Cross-chop the “rounds”
4 – Place in a large bowl.
5 – Repeat steps 1 – 4 until all greens have been chopped.
6 – Add remaining ingredients to bowl and mix.
7 – With hands, ‘massage” greens until bulk is reduced by half.
8 – Set aside to marinate for one hour (or up to 24 hours).
Alternatively, eat right away
.

Just in case you missed it – find my CHAMPAGNE Rejuvelac recipe here.

Get moving!!! There are only 5-1/2 days until New Year’s Eve. Yes, you CAN celebrate in style!!!

12/18/08 Winter CSA SHARE: what we got

In the share box, I got:
A lot of small potatoes– a lot!
6 fairly large/fat carrots
1 microscopic garlic head (about the size of two cloves of an average garlic head)
a lot of small broccoli heads with leaves
two big heads of cabbage

Everyone was commenting that they thought there was not as much in the box as last year, but I think that, weight-wise, the box was right (I carried last year’s box home on my back – this year, I got smart and took our grocery cart with me), and that it was just that there wasn’t as much variety as there was in the first box last year.

The fruit share was a bag of about 8 apples. (I think we got more apples last year). The good thing (since I am the coordinator) was that the apples came already bagged (since, for some reason, all of the CSA’s collected bags had disappeared). I remember that, last year, Liz, who was the coordinator, had to weigh all the apples and put them in bags for the members who had fruit shares. I was there but I wasn’t a volunteer, but I watched and I remember that they had something like 7lbs of apples in that first share. Oh, well. This is this year.

I signed up for two bottles of cider, so that was as expected. I just have to hurry up and drink it all, since it is fresh, and won’t last much more than a week. Yumm! I will drink some in the morning, and then again for dinner. It’s a plan.

I heard people planning cabbage/potato soup.
I think, since now I am in potato overload, I am going to go back to my old
search for a way to prepare potatoes RAW.
I found a new one today, but I don’t like it.
I am going to try the idea that I remember seeing in my early raw on-line days, which I have not been able to find again.
If/when it works, I will document it here.

NIBBLES – what I did with the leftovers

Last night, I made spaghetti with zucchini pasta and a tomato/onion/red bell pepper/almond sauce. My sauce came out thick, but I like it that way.

After dinner, I looked at the leftover sauce and just knew I was not oing to eat it this week.  I had a leftover zucchini so I sliced it on the mandonline and then put a spoonful of sauce on each slice and everything in the dehydrator overnight.  This morning, I was amazed at how small the zucchini slices had shrunk, but I was very pleased with the taste of these little bites. My room-mate says they taste like pizza.  Next time, though, I am going to slice the zucchini thicker.

SAME PLAN AS LAST YEAR

The CSA is going to start up again in the beginning of June. I am making the same commitment to myself as I did last year: I will use everything in the box. (If the farm does as much lettuce as they did last year, I will have to start liking green smoothies, whether I want to or not).

It will be interesting. I am looking forward to it.