Tag Archives: raw food books

CARMELLA’S SUNNY RAW KITCHEN RETURNS!

I’m happy to see that Carmella, of the Sunny Raw Kitchen blog, has come back to us, with a dynamic new website, Carmella’s Sunny Raw Kitchen.  She has some free recipes there, and she is also offering special prices on her books.

GORILLA FOOD: great new recipe book – my new favorite!

POST #904
Was POST #901
I was very interested to receive this copy of Gorilla Food, by Aaron Ash, of the Vancouver restaurant by the same name.  Oh, this book is nice! Enticing new flavor ideas, fresh innovative recipes, pretty pictures – oh my! Get this book here

This is a recipe book – you asked for raw recipes and here they are. After a two page introduction, which tells the curious how the Gorilla Foods restaurant in Vancouver, BC, Canada came into being, and shows a picture pictures of a 1960s-throwback-looking space, it launches into a clarification of terms and descriptions of the appliances and tools needed to work the magic, as well as a shopping list, i.e., all of the ingredients which will be eventually called for in the recipes.

After that come the recipes. Now, if you like more or less “instant food” (not much more than a food processor involved), and don’t like to plan a day or two in advance, many of these recipes will not work for you as they are written (many require dehydration, or include dehydrated recipes detailed on other pages), but, often, the “raw” parts, i.e., the parts before you dehydrate, are good enough on their own – for example, although the Morning Curry Crepes call for the dehydrated Ginger Tomato Crepe,  recipe would be just as good sitting in a bowl for you to spoon up.  So it goes… I see this book as requiring a bit of creativity if you are to get the most from it – just about every page has something exciting, mouthwatering, or really curious.

That said, there are some truly innovative (as in: I haven’t seen this before) recipes for vegetable mixes, sauces, cheezes, condiments, crackers/breads/wraps/chips, and desserts. If you take the often unique vegetable mix ideas, and start adding different sauces, you get altogether different and exciting experiences. If you are willing to do the dehydrated breads/crackers/chips/wraps (which you can do in advance and freeze – you knew that, right?), you expand your options exponentially

When you get to the desserts in Gorilla Food, you will start to drool. Many of the desserts just involve combining the ingredients, and voila! Of course, the really fancy-looking ones in the pictures  the use of a dehydrator, but, often, the ingredients will taste good without the dehydrator, and just will be more like goo, or something you have to eat with a spoon.

There! I’ve just taken apart Gorilla Food and digested it into a recipe book for people who only have a knife, or, at best, a food processor. You can make almost all of these things (save the breads, the chips, the crackers) in a beginner raw food kitchen.

If you are a beginner, if you are an old hand, Gorilla Food will be worth your while.  So, do check out Gorilla Food. It is so very fanciful, and just this side of very basic raw food (which you don’t see much in recipe books anymore), with a kick!

You can get this book here

SANDOR KATZ’S NEW BOOK: The Art of Fermentation

POST #860
Okay, I’ve gone and proved it now. I am a culture junkie (maybe not as much as some people, but culturing foods is high on my list of fun things to do).

Today, I received Sandor Katz’s The Art of Fermentation.  This is not a book for someone who just wants some fermenting recipes (for that, check out my list of raw fermenting/culturing books in My Raw Library . )  The Art of Fermentation is like an encyclopedia of the ways to ferment foods.  I inhaled it in one sitting (Okay, I read things I know I am interested in and looked at all of the pictures — I will go back and read bits of it as I feel the call.)  I should mention that this is not an all-raw book on fermentation, nor is it vegetarian — Katz explores all areas of culturing/fermenting/aging foodstuffs of all sorts.

What a fun book to have!
.

NEW ACQUISITION: Richter’s Nature the Healer

After I had acquired Vera Richter’s Mrs. Richter’s Cook-Less Book, I was pleasantly surprised to discover Nature-The Healer, a 1936 book written by John and Vera Ricther, for a very reasonable price on Amazon. You may recall that John and Vera Richter operated a raw food restaurant from the 1920s to the 1940s.
This book is probably not anything you need. Written in a question/answer format, it addressed a number of health issues and dietary concerns, with an eye to how they might be healed via nutritional methods. It is, essentially, the precursor of such books as Linda Page’s Healthy Healing and Phyllis Balch’s Prescription for Dietary Wellness. As I am very interested in raw vegan nutrition, this book is interesting to me because it is quite possibly the first such book written in America, and, very likely, the rest of the world, as well. Furthermore, it may well be the first known book on nutritional healing – my copy was originally owned by an MD in Los Angeles, who was, apparently, interested in nutritional healing (I am not usually privy to the names of previous owners of the books I collect, however this MD’s name and office address are stamped in several places in the book).
I am looking forward to studying this wonderful book, which Dr. Richter wrote in 1936, when he was 84, just 2 years before he transitioned.

CRAZY SEXY KITCHEN: Kris Carr’s great new recipe book

Post #852
I received Kris Carr’s Crazy Sexy Kitchen today. (I have followed Kris Carr pretty much since she started an Internet presence talking about nutrition as a way to overcome cancer, which is one of my interests as a nutrition consultant).

I was pleasantly surprised that this book contains so many interesting raw recipes that I haven’t seen anywhere else (lately, that is my new bellwether: how many times have I seen this idea with one ingredient change, or, is this something new or incredibly innovative?). Even among the cooked recipes, there is often a suggestion as to how to make them raw.

Although the book is co-written by Chad Sarno, a chef in his own wright, a number of other chefs have contributed recipes to it.

Notably, quite a few of the raw recipes look like things I can envision myself putting together in the near future (oh, if you don’t know me, that is pretty much the highest accolade I know how to give to a collection of raw recipes – I am really old school, and, also, a really lazy eater, so, if something looks enticing, and it looks like something that I would be willing to spend time eating, and I think I might actually be willing to put in the time to make it, that wins the blue ribbon). There are also a number of interesting and delicious-looking vegan but non-raw recipes, which would make this a very good book for those who might be transitioning to either a vegan or a raw vegan diet.

Aside from the recipes, one of the things I really liked about this book was the initial sections about food preparation equipment, starting from knife descriptions (this is always my favorite, as my first “food processor” was my beautiful knife, which I still have) and going through just about everything, including dehydrators; and methods for cutting (this is like a mini chef-prep course by itself).

By me, this is one of the best new vegan/raw vegan books out there. Despite my initial reservations, I’m glad I made the leap of faith and got it

FREDERIC PATENAUDE BOOKS: GOOD DEALS HERE and no endless ads

POST #851
Frederic Patenaude books are on amazon.com!

You no longer need to scroll through miles of “but wait! there’s more! Did you know? Do you want to…?”

If you already know what you want, you can go to amazon.com and pick up those books at reasonable prices.

2 CLASSIC RAW FOOD BOOKS & 1 RAWMAZING BOOK

POST #850
I LOVE GETTING NEW BOOKS!  I love books, period, but, when I get more books, I love that more. Today, I received three raw food books that I had ordered while I was away.  Boy oh boy!  Two are for my EARLY RAW FOOD BOOKS collection, and the other one is a book I had never heard of before the author sent me an email the other day.

I am very excited to finally have a copy of what may be the first raw food book published in America (1925), Mrs. Richter’s Cook-Less Book, by Vera Richter.  Vera Richter, together with her husband, Dr. John Richter, opened the first raw food restaurant in Los Angeles, Eutropheon, in 1917, and ran it until the late 1940s.  The book includes recipes for the dishes served in the restaurant. These are recipes from the days before food processors and dehydrators, so they are all quite simple to prepare.(Interestingly, someone has copied this book and made a Kindle version, so, unless you are a fanatic, like me, and must have the original, you can read through it on your Kindle for a highly reasonable price).

I also received a copy of John Tobe’s 1969 Health Giving, Life Saving No-Cook Book, which Raw Chef Dan showed me when I was at his studio a couple of weeks ago.  This is an interesting book – it is not 100% raw, but it does have a lot of good raw recipes (early raw food writers often included non-raw items in their recipe books).  The No-Cook Book would be a very good introduction for people transitioning to a raw diet.

I’ve been reading Susan Powers’ recipes on her Rawmazing site for quite a while, and have used quite a few of them.  The other day, I got an email from her, announcing her book, Rawmazing: Over 130 Simple Raw Recipes for Radiant Health, on Amazon.com for a very accessible price, so I ordered it. Wow! Among the usual re-worked recipes that we see versions of in almost every cookbook, there are some very nice, unique, tasty-sounding recipes in Rawmazing.  One thing I find interesting is that she uses sprouted wheat in a number of recipes –something we don’t usually see in raw recipes books.  I am looking forward to reading through this book more in depth, and, very likely, making some of the recipes.

FERMENTED FOODS: My first fermented food book: Truly Cultured

POST #800
Truly Cultured, by Nancy Lee Bentley, was the first book I bought on fermenting foods. I made my first sauerkraut following the recipe in the book (with the exception that I chose to add 2 capsules of New Chapter Probiotic All-Flora — I added the probiotics then, and I continue to add probiotics to my ferments because, when I began making nut cheeze, probiotics were recommended, and I experienced success, and, also, because everyone I spoke to said it was difficult to make sauerkraut, and that, in all likelihood, my first batch would fail.  To date, only one batch, the one I made without the probiotics, has failed).

Truly Cultured is an excellent introduction to making fermented/pickled/cultured foods. I count it among my go-to books on fermentation.

FERMENTED FOODS: My favorite book: Wild Fermentation

POST #799
Since I’m on a roll with this fermentation thing, I might as well tell you about my favorite book: Wild Fermentation: The Flavor, Nutrition, and Craft of Live-Culture Foods by Sandor Katz.

This is one of the first books on fermentation that I got, and it is still the book I go back to time after time.  It seems that, every time I read through it, I find something new, no matter how often I go through it.

There is background information, info on ways of fermenting, and, also, interesting recipes that I probably will never try, as well as ones I have tried and loved.

For a beginner, or a fermenter who just wants a refresher, or else a refreshing read, this book is fabulous.

RAW VEGAN FERMENTED VEGETABLE RECIPES: Complete Idiot’s Guide to Fermenting Foods

POST #796
I’ve just added another book on fermenting raw vegetables, The Complete Idiot’s Guide to Fermenting Foods, by Wardeh Harmon, to my collection.

As is most often the case with books on fermentation or culturing of foods, this book is not only for raw vegans.  The sections on Vegetables and Fruit, however, are about raw food culturing,  and the majority of the recipes in Non-Alcoholic Beverages, as well as many in the  Condiments  chapter, are also raw.

The first chapters, on the whys and hows,  of fermentation, and the tools to use are very educational.   Although the book recommends using whey (a dairy product) for its lactobacillus content, it also offers a raw vegan option (water kefir), and gives detailed instruction as to how to use the water kefir.  (I will probably just stick with throwing my New Chapter probiotics powder into the mix — it has always worked for me — the only ferment batch I’ve ever lost was the sauerkraut I forgot to put the probiotics in).

The recipes are clear and detailed enough that a neophyte could manage a successful ferment right off the bat.  

I will put this one on my go-to shelf, for sure, especially when I am thinking of trying something new.