Tag Archives: RAW FERMENTATION

KOMBUCHA & KEFIR RESEARCH

POST #942
I have the kombucha scoby and the water kefir grains in the refrigerator. The Russell James Chef Homestudy course I’m going through now has, just this week, given me a very good grounding in what I need to do for kombucha and kefir brewing. I just like to read up on as much background as I can.

KOMBUCHA
kombucha scoby getkombuchaI’m finding out that I may have destroyed my kombucha scoby – who knew that you shouldn’t put it in the refrigerator. Well, it’s been in there almost a week, and I probably won’t try to do anything with it until at least tomorrow. (the scoby picture is from getkombucha.com)

Meanwhile, I have found two downloadable kombucha brewing guides on-line:

The Cultures for Health ebook  is very extensive – it covers in pretty much detail just about anything you want to know. This site also has quite a few informative videos on kombucha

Kombucha Kamp’s kombucha guide is concise and informative. I like it as a checklist for after I have read through the entire Cultures for Health book.

Yemoos Nourishing Cultures’ kombucha FAQ  has some useful information, as well.

More details at GetKombucha.com What is Kombucha

dried kombucha kombuchananaDrying kombucha – I kept trying to find out how to dehydrate kombucha, but never came up with anything much about using a dehydrator. Most of the info was about how to air dry it. I saw one mention of dehydrating at 105 degrees, but when I tried to follow that google link, I didn’t find anything further. It seems you are supposed to dry it to jerky consistency, but, on kombuchanana , which has some interesting ideas for what to do with dried scoby, I saw this picture where it looks pretty dry.

water kefir grains wikipediaKEFIR
Cultures for Health has videos on water kefir . Their ebook deals only with milk kefir, but it is free and has interesting information (the picture is from Wikipedia)

Yemoos Nourishing Cultures has an extensive online water kefir “book”  which covers just about anything you could want to know.

Wellness Mama’s recipe promises Kefir soda  .

Lea’s Cooking’s kefir article  gives her recipes , as well as recipes she has found in her web research

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FIRE CIDER RECIPE from Rosemary Gladstar

POST #880
I cannot have the flu vaccine (allergies, reactions, etc.& so forth, and even if I could, I don’t know that I would — this is not to say that you shouldn’t, if you feel so inclined), so I am happy to see this traditional cold/flu remedy recipe.

HOME-MADE FIRE CIDER
From Rosemary Gladstar, MountainRose blog
Fire Cider is a traditional cold remedy with deep roots in folk medicine. The tasty combination of vinegar infused with powerful immune-boosting, anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, anti-viral, decongestant, and spicy circulatory movers makes this recipe especially pleasant and easy to incorporate into your daily diet to help boost the immune system, stimulate digestion, and get you nice and warmed up on cold days.
Because this is a folk preparation, the ingredients can change from year to year depending on when you make it and what’s growing around you. The standard base ingredients are apple cider vinegar, garlic, onion, ginger, horseradish, and hot peppers, but there are plenty of other herbs that can be thrown in for added kick. This year I had lots of spicy jalapenos and vibrant rosemary in the garden, so I used those along with some organic turmeric powder in the cupboard and fresh lemon peel. Some people like to bury their fire cider jar in the ground for a month while it extracts and then dig it up during a great feast to celebrate the changing of the seasons.
Fire Cider can be taken straight by the spoonful, added to organic veggie juice (throw in some olives and pickles and think non-alcoholic, health boosting bloody mary!), splashed in fried rice, or drizzled on a salad with good olive oil. You can also save the strained pulp and mix it with shredded veggies like carrots, cabbage, broccoli, and fresh herbs to make delicious and aromatic stir-fries and spring rolls! I like to take 1 tbsp each morning to help warm me up and rev the immune system, or 3 tbsp at the first sign of a cold.
Time to make the Fire Cider!

FIRE CIDER INGREDIENTS
1/2 cup fresh grated organic ginger root
1/2 cup fresh grated organic horseradish root
1 medium organic onion, chopped
10 cloves of organic garlic, crushed or chopped
2 organic jalapeno peppers, chopped
Zest and juice from 1 organic lemon
Several sprigs of fresh organic rosemary or 2 tbsp of dried rosemary leaves
1 tbsp organic turmeric powder
organic apple cider vinegar
raw local honey to taste

DIRECTIONS
Prepare all of your cold-fighting roots, fruits, and herbs and place them in a quart sized jar. If you’ve never grated fresh horseradish, be prepared for a powerful sinus opening experience! Use a piece of natural parchment paper or wax paper under the lid to keep the vinegar from touching the metal. Shake well! Store in a dark, cool place for one month and remember to shake daily.
After one month, use cheesecloth to strain out the pulp, pouring the vinegar into a clean jar. Be sure to squeeze as much of the liquid goodness as you can from the pulp while straining. Next, comes the honey! Add 1/4 cup of honey and stir until incorporated. Taste your cider and add another 1/4 cup unrtil you reach the desired sweetness.
INGREDIENT VARIATIONS
These herbs and spices would make a wonderful addition to your Fire Cider creations: Thyme, Cayenne, Rosehips, Ginseng, Orange, Grapefruit, Schizandra berries, Astragalus, Parsley, Burdock, Oregano, Peppercorns

CULTURED VEGGIES FOR FLU PREVENTION – from Nourished Kitchen

POST #879
CULTURED VEGGIES FOR FLU PREVENTION
from Nourished Kitchen

Donna Schwenk, the author, says:”These are a little spicy, and a little sweet and sour. They are wonderful for digesting your food, building up your immune system, and helping your adrenals feel nourished. It is the flavor I love the best. I’m a foodie and it has to taste good! You can find Vegetable Starter Culture online or in well-stocked health food stores.”

CULTURED VEGGIES FOR FLU PREVENTION
Yield: 2 quarts (64 Servings) Prep: 5 mins
1 medium jicama
1/2 head cabbage
2 handfuls fresh spinach
1 medium apple
1 small onion
1 clove garlic (minced)
1 1/2 teaspoons unrefined sea salt
1 large orange (zested and juiced)
1 package vegetable starter culture

  • Shred or chop the first six ingredients and place¬† in a bowl and sprinkle with salt.
  • You can also layer it in the jar instead of mixing.
  • Firmly pack the mixture into 2 quart glass canning jars or a half-gallon jar
  • Then add the orange zest juice, and culture, and cover with water, leaving an inch or two at the top.
  • Seal jar tightly and let sit on the counter for 6 days and then place in the refrigerator

I haven’t tried this yet, but I will start it this week. I will use 2-3 probiotics capsules instead of the “vegetable starter culture”, which contains sugar and dairy.

YOU CAN’T GET THAT HERE (at least not on every street corner, for sure)

POST #805
Living in New York City is very exciting, for sure! If you come here as a tourist, you can find all sorts of things that they don’t have back home, I’m sure (although, I’m sure, if you’re looking to dis us, you’ll find a lot of the same stores you have back home, too).

What we don’t have here is things that you take for granted. This evening, I went out to get some pickling spice, only to find that two local supermarkets don’t carry such a thing, although they have all sorts of exotic Spanish and Arabic spices. Neither could I find dill seed. (I’m going to leave home 2 hours early so I can go to the one supermarket that I think might carry pickling spice, and dill seed, and I am also going to carry a recipe for pickling spice, just in case even they do not have pickling spice. These green beans will not last forever while I search the world for pickling spice so I can make the recipe I want to try. Just in case, I have an alternate recipe that I have invented in my head, which should turn out okay – hope hope)