Category Archives: RAW FOOD BLOG LINKS

RAW ANIMAL CRACKERS from Nouveau Raw

POST #979
ANIMAL CRACKERS NOUVEAU RAW

You’ve got to love Amie Sue Oldfather and her Nouveau Raw creations!  She just doesn’t stop coming up with great ideas.

Her photo here shows the raw animal crackers she has come up with this time!  Cute, tasty, and easy enough to make. The step-by-step instructions with illustrative photos and useful tips make this recipe look do-able. 

If you haven’t visited Nouveau Raw, now is the time to go there. I always find something there that I haven’t thought of before.  It really is a one-stop shop, brimming with great recipes and wonderful ideas.

CARMELLA’S SUNNY RAW KITCHEN RETURNS!

I’m happy to see that Carmella, of the Sunny Raw Kitchen blog, has come back to us, with a dynamic new website, Carmella’s Sunny Raw Kitchen.  She has some free recipes there, and she is also offering special prices on her books.

KALE UNIVERSITY RECIPES

POST #898
Do you like kale and want more kale recipes?  Toot on over to Kale University and pick up their free KALE UNIVERSITY COMMUNITY COOKBOOK KALE RECIPES  The price is right and the recipes are righteous.

FIRE CIDER RECIPE from Rosemary Gladstar

POST #880
I cannot have the flu vaccine (allergies, reactions, etc.& so forth, and even if I could, I don’t know that I would — this is not to say that you shouldn’t, if you feel so inclined), so I am happy to see this traditional cold/flu remedy recipe.

HOME-MADE FIRE CIDER
From Rosemary Gladstar, MountainRose blog
Fire Cider is a traditional cold remedy with deep roots in folk medicine. The tasty combination of vinegar infused with powerful immune-boosting, anti-inflammatory, anti-bacterial, anti-viral, decongestant, and spicy circulatory movers makes this recipe especially pleasant and easy to incorporate into your daily diet to help boost the immune system, stimulate digestion, and get you nice and warmed up on cold days.
Because this is a folk preparation, the ingredients can change from year to year depending on when you make it and what’s growing around you. The standard base ingredients are apple cider vinegar, garlic, onion, ginger, horseradish, and hot peppers, but there are plenty of other herbs that can be thrown in for added kick. This year I had lots of spicy jalapenos and vibrant rosemary in the garden, so I used those along with some organic turmeric powder in the cupboard and fresh lemon peel. Some people like to bury their fire cider jar in the ground for a month while it extracts and then dig it up during a great feast to celebrate the changing of the seasons.
Fire Cider can be taken straight by the spoonful, added to organic veggie juice (throw in some olives and pickles and think non-alcoholic, health boosting bloody mary!), splashed in fried rice, or drizzled on a salad with good olive oil. You can also save the strained pulp and mix it with shredded veggies like carrots, cabbage, broccoli, and fresh herbs to make delicious and aromatic stir-fries and spring rolls! I like to take 1 tbsp each morning to help warm me up and rev the immune system, or 3 tbsp at the first sign of a cold.
Time to make the Fire Cider!

FIRE CIDER INGREDIENTS
1/2 cup fresh grated organic ginger root
1/2 cup fresh grated organic horseradish root
1 medium organic onion, chopped
10 cloves of organic garlic, crushed or chopped
2 organic jalapeno peppers, chopped
Zest and juice from 1 organic lemon
Several sprigs of fresh organic rosemary or 2 tbsp of dried rosemary leaves
1 tbsp organic turmeric powder
organic apple cider vinegar
raw local honey to taste

DIRECTIONS
Prepare all of your cold-fighting roots, fruits, and herbs and place them in a quart sized jar. If you’ve never grated fresh horseradish, be prepared for a powerful sinus opening experience! Use a piece of natural parchment paper or wax paper under the lid to keep the vinegar from touching the metal. Shake well! Store in a dark, cool place for one month and remember to shake daily.
After one month, use cheesecloth to strain out the pulp, pouring the vinegar into a clean jar. Be sure to squeeze as much of the liquid goodness as you can from the pulp while straining. Next, comes the honey! Add 1/4 cup of honey and stir until incorporated. Taste your cider and add another 1/4 cup unrtil you reach the desired sweetness.
INGREDIENT VARIATIONS
These herbs and spices would make a wonderful addition to your Fire Cider creations: Thyme, Cayenne, Rosehips, Ginseng, Orange, Grapefruit, Schizandra berries, Astragalus, Parsley, Burdock, Oregano, Peppercorns

HURRICANE ALLEY: What do I do when there’s a hurricane outside?

POST #847
What do I do when there is a hurricane outside?

Well… first, I watch the weather for too long, and, then, when I cannot take it anymore, I get up and go to the kitchen and make stuff. Today, that was kale chips and sunflower seed crackers.

After I did that, I raced back to the computer, just in case the power might go off, and found a new cool site, Nouveau Raw, with great recipes, read them all, then sat around and thought about making something else. [I really really liked Nouveau Raw. It is almost like a raw food training. Who knew there could be so many things to address on such an attractive blog?  I’ll be going back there soon and often]
That brought me up to now.

Time to hop in bed. The hurricane can wait or go away.

RAW VEGAN FERMENTED VEGETABLE RECIPES: PickleMeToo blog

POST #795
I’ve been spending some time at the Pickle Me Too blog this morning. This blog has an amazing collection of fermented vegetable/pickle recipes, which I’ve found handy since I suddenly want to try something more than sauerkraut and pickled turnips (both of which I do adore, and put in everything, btw). I’m just looking for things to vary my take-to-work-for-lunch choices.

There is also a page on setting up a continuous kombucha brewing system, which makes kombucha brewing seem easy enough for me to give it another try.

While this blog is not raw vegan, the concentration of fermenting recipes make it well worth checking out.

30 FREE DEHYDRATOR RECIPES

POST #774
The blog Healthy Blender Recipes is offering 30 free dehydrator recipes this month.  You have to go to the blog every day to get the recipes, but the first few I have seen look luscious.  As the blog mentions, some of them look too fancy or expensive to mess with on a whim, but some of the ideas inside of the recipes I will probably never make are useful for things I would make.  Hey! Free recipes are nothing to scoff at.  If you don’t want to make one, don’t download it, or else, do download it on the off-chance that you might make it one day, or that you might use a technique for something else.

FREE RAW VEGAN FOOD PREP E-BOOK GIVE-AWAY CONTEST

POST #755

Suzanne Kristin is holding a contest to  give away free raw vegan recipe books.  Check here to find out how to participate:

Kristin Suzanne Raw Vegan Recipe E-book Give-away Contest

Good luck!

ARE THE OATS YOU ARE BUYING RAW?

The subject of the rawness of steel-cut oats  recently came up on the frugalraw mailing list .  It got me thinking, and I ended up spending a couple of hours roaming the Internet and learning quite a bit about oats, commercial oat production, oat farming, and oat sprouting.

As much of what I learned was eye-opening, I’ve decided to include the results of my research here, in an expanded form of my original post to the mailing list.

Are steel cut oats raw? Good question!  I googled oats and steel cut oats, and found that most sources tend to pussy-foot around the issue.

Wikipedia states that hulled oats ” pass through a heat and moisture treatment to balance moisture, but mainly to stabilize the groat. Oat groats are high in fat (lipids) and once exposed from their protective hull, enzymatic (lipase) activity begins to break down the fat into free fatty acids, ultimately causing an off flavor or rancidity. Oats will begin to show signs of enzymatic rancidity within 4 days of being dehulled and not stabilized. This process is primarily done in food grade plants, not in feed grade plants. An oat groat is not considered a raw oat groat if it has gone through this process: the heat has disrupted the germ, and the oat groat will not sprout.”

Does this mean that oat groats and steel-cut oats which are sold as food products raw or not?

Wisegeek.com says “Just as with all types of prepared oats, steel cut oats are made from oat grains that have been hulled and steamed. Generally the finished oat groats that are destined for preparation as steel cut oats are also roasted, helping to release an enhanced flavor in the oat groats.”

Companies which produce and package oats and steel cut oats do not say that their oats are a raw product.  The closest that any such company comes, per my research, is McCann’s claim that other companies’ oats undergo extensive heat processing, which affects the flavor.  McCann’s does not state, however, that their product is *not heat processed*)

Bob’s Red Mill, which offers both flax seed meal (known to go rancid quickly) and steel-cut oats, cautions consumers to keep the flax meal refrigerated for freshness, but does not offer similar advice for its steel-cut oats (what does this say?)

Sprouthouse.com lists “Oat Groats Raw Organic” but says “These are NOT oats for oat grass.”  (and why not?  This statement does beg the question.)

Sproutpeople.com lists oats for growing oatgrass “these are the same seeds we sell for Oat Sprouts.  Hulless Oats do not usually grow a great crop of grass.”  Under the sproutpeople.com listing for sprouting seed, “hulless Nebraska oats” are listed as “Hulless, tender and very quick to sprout. These are a wonderfully tender grain with a mild sweetness. Raw, not cooked, not heated, not hulled.”  The claim is very clear, here, however confusing — if these oats are not hulled, how are they hulless?

The question of how those Nebraska oats got to be hulless is answered, at length, in Katherine Czapp’s article “Naked Oats”, on the Weston A. Price Foundation site , which suggests that “hulless oats” (avena nuda, as opposed to the more common avena sativa) were once commonly grown in America:

“Naked oats, so called because the kernels thresh free of the hulls, have been grown for centuries ….can also be easily used as porridge or other food for humans.

The nutrition profile of naked oats is quite impressive, with contributions rich in minerals and vitamins and a fat content rivaling that of corn, along with high-quality protein similar to that found in soybeans…… Naked oats also supply unsaturated fatty acids that contribute to the production of higher quality eggs, milk and meat products.”

This article also tells us that early colonists  grew “silpee”, also known as “pilcorn” and “peelcorn” (avena nuda), which they sometimes referred to as “corn,” both to feed their livestock and to make the traditional Scottish porridge “sowens.”

Seedsofchange.com, an on-line organic seed supplier, says of its avena nuda  (listed as hulless oats) “produces oats without a thick hull, easy process [sic]  for home use. ”

TO MAKE A LONG STORY SHORT:  If your steel-cut oats have been made from “naked oats”, then they may well be raw.  If the oat groats you buy are from “naked oats”, then they may well be raw.  Pointedly ask your supplier/food market if the oats you are interested in buying can be sprouted.   If your oats are from “avena sativa”, the most commonly available oats in America and Europe, their rawness must be suspect. If this concerns you, you should track down the producer and pin them down to a specific yes/no answer on the question of heat-processing.

Getting Ready for New Year’s

I went out today and go the supplies to make my little New Year’s celebration.  I’m planning to spend time alone on New Year’s Eve.  I don’t get a lot of quite time alone, but my room-mate is in Japan with her family, so I am going to luxuriate in the quiet.  I may even take a bubble bath…

Tonight, I have started some rejuvelac wine to celebrate.  I don’t know that I am going to make champagne rejuvelac this year. I’ll decide tomorrow when I start the rejuvelac.

I have also started soaking some black-eyed peas to sprout for my traditional good-luck black-eyed peas on New Year’s Day.  I also have a small bunch of collards which I will prepare on New Year’s Eve and let marinate until New Year’s Day.

I’ve also laid in 10 nice big lemons, some sea salt, a jug of Grade B organic maple syrup, and some herbal laxative tea, so I can begin my Master Cleanse on New Year’s night — I think it is better to go ahead with my traditional New Year’s good luck meal, and then get started with the Master Cleanse.  (I have heard of a powder that you can use for the Master Cleanse, and, when I run out lemons, I may buy it and see how it works– that is still up in the air– I have enough lemons for most of the first 10 days.