Category Archives: PATES

THAT RECIPE WITHOUT A DEHYDRATOR????

Have you ever noticed that many dehydrator recipes, particularly for “mock meats” can be done without the dehydrator as “pates”? I mean, think about it… the ingredients will be the same, but it will usually just be more sticky or gooier… but the taste will not ordinarily be that different.

Since I used to use a dehydrator, but now do not, I have been thinking about this often enough. What used to be a “burger” could now be a “burger pate”, if you can’t figure out a better name. These recipes could be forkable, good for leafy wraps (romaine, collard, or whatever), or thrown atop salad ingredients.

Why should those of us who do not use dehydrators dismiss the dehydrator- oriented recipes out of hand. Yes, of course, the cracker recipes might not be your main attack point, but all of those interesting burger/faux meat recipes could work perfectly well on your plate as “pates”, or atop your salad as protein as well as flavor additives, or even spread across a pepper slice as a snack or ‘hors d’ouerves’, used to top a mushroom, or plopped on the side of whatever else you are eating as another ingredient in the meal.

So, when you look at a new recipe book, which dismayingly seems loaded with “entree-like” recipes which call for a dehydrator, don’t just pass that section by… think what it would be like if you just made a pate instead. My experience with my old dehydrator recipes has been very enlightening.

Just saying….

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WHAT WE GOT & WHAT I AM DOING WITH IT

Here’s the breakdown from Thursday’s share

Kohlrabi – 1 pc    actually we got several pieces
Fennel – 1 pce       I traded for a big kohlrabi
Carrots – 1 bun     the carrots were kind of small. I put them through the juicer
Cilantro – 1 bun    a big bunch
Escarole – 1 hd      this was a large head
Scallions – 1 bun    traded for more cilantro
Arugula – 1 bag       we got choggia beets
Green Romaine Lettuce – 1 hd    traded for more beets
Green Boston Lettuce – 1 hd

I put the carrots through the juicer and got a small juice glass of carrot juice. I froze the pulp for use in something later.

I’ve made a couple of different versions of raw ravioli, using the large kohlrabi.  I cut it in half and sliced it with my thin slicer (looks like a vegetable peeler, but it’s very wide).  I put my cashew-kale pate and cilantro in the raviolis, and I also made the “chicken pate” recipe from Ani Phyo’s first book and put it in the wraps with some cilantro.

I used the escarole in some wraps with the cashew-kale pate, onion, tomato, cilantro, and lentil sprouts.   I also made a soup with lentil sprouts by dehydrating chopped up  escarole leaves to tender, then adding garlic, olive oil, a little sea salt (!) and black pepper, cilantro, and some red pepper flakes, and dehydrating for a few hours until it was warm.

Well, the lettuce has gone into salads, duh. I also threw some of it, along with some escarole, and an apple, into the blender for a smoothie.  Yuck.  I drank it anyway.  It’s good for me, right?

The beets, you ask?  My beet salad (beets into the food processor along with olive oil, apple cider vinegar, onions, and garlic – with some cilantro!).  I also made a “slaw” with some kohlrabi, beets, apple cider vinegar, onions, extra virgin olive oil, garlic,  and – yes! cilantro! — I put the kohlrabi in the food processor first, and ground it to almost apple sauce consistency, removed it, then put the beets and everything else in, then tossed all in a bowl — the idea was to have white color, but the beets in colored the kohlrabi anyway

My room-mate and I are tentatively back on a two-day meal share plan, so I am planning some fancy kohlrabi raviolo (not sure what will go in them yet), with a sauce of some sort – likely sun-dried tomatoes with something;  a lettuce, escarole, seaweed salad with lentil or sunflower sprouts and a vinaigrette of some sort. I might make the escarole soup again, as well – I liked it, and I will have enough time on Wednesday to do all of the dehydrating.

I’m glad to be back to a one day a week meal share because it gives me a chance to use up stuff I won’t eat all of by myself (I mean, I have been eating all of my share because I have no money to buy other food, but it sure would be nice to have a helping hand, and my room-mate loves salads.)

Of course, we do expect the appearance of sauerkraut somewhere in all of this.  I still have 1/2 qt jalapeno sauerkraut.  I’ll be making more sauerkraut by week end.

6/7/12 CSA SHARE: WHAT I ACTUALLY GOT & WHAT I AM GOING TO DO WITH IT

I love it when the CSA is in season. It is so nice to go there and see so many happy people picking up their shares. Sometimes they are even friendly.

Yesterday afternoon, I went to pick up my share (early shares are always slim pickings, and overloaded with lettuce-t kinds of things, but… hey! That’s the way it is — they really really want me to start liking salads.

Yesterday, we got:
Baby Arugula – 1 bag
Romaine Lettuce – 1 head
Boston Lettuce – 1 head
Swiss Chard – 1 bunch
Garlic Scapes – 1 bunch
Japanese Salad Turnips – 1 bunch
STRAWBERRIES!  We got strawberries in the box, and I also got strawberries as my fruit share! Yum! Smoothies!

ARUGULA – I decided to keep it. I’m not overly fond of arugula, but I decided to make a raw version of the Greek beet, arugula, and goat cheese salad (I’ll post it later
ROMAINE – I kept it. I think I’ll make some wraps.
BOSTON LETTUCE – I like this stuff well enough.   I can deal with a salad or two a week.  This is a fairly big head, so I might be having three salads. I like to mix in seaweed (I stalk the Japanese supermarkets for sales on the mixed, or else I just get wakame when it is in the bulk bins at Integral Yoga Foods, my favorite natural foods store) and sauerkraut, along with onion, and, if I have it, some red bell pepper.
SWISS CHARD – I am still not ready to even try to like this stuff.  It is high on my yuck scale. I traded it for more turnips.
GARLIC SCAPES– these look weird, but they are GREEN, and they taste like garlic, so I like them.  I chop them up or grind them in the food processor,  and put them in everything as a garlic (they are a part of one kind of garlic).  These will get chopped or ground and put in salad, or go into pates.  Since I was lucky and got two bunches, I will probably experiment with my next sauerkraut, and put some sliced garlic scapes in there with lots of sliced jalapeno.
JAPANESE SALAD TURNIPS – I have no clue why they call them Japanese Salad Turnips (my Japanese room-mate did not recognize them.  When I was testing a recipe with them, she said she had never seen them before).  So, okay, they are all white, where other turnips have some purple on them. Never mind. They are turnips and they taste like turnips. I grind them in the food processor to almost an applesauce consistency, then add apple cider vinegar, olive olive oil, and any seasonings which strike my fancy (usually garlic, sometimes coriander, sometimes Spike)
STRAWBERRIES – These are going in smoothies. I am not really into eating right now, but I know I need some protein, so I will put these into a hemp or soy protein shake in the morning. I am also thinking of making some strawberry leather in the dehydrator.

So! I have things to do with all these vegetables!  I got into a use- everything -in-the-box a few years ago, when the CSA issued a challenge.  I continued it when my job went south – the CSA box was my food for the week (I’d have maybe $5 more to get other food.  Good I have that experience because I am back there now. Smart people who have full-time work tell me about all the things I should do, like save money, or invest in a 401K, but, when you can barely pay the rent, and you have to think twice about what food to get, and you can’t afford your health insurance and medicine copays on top of all that, well, the CSA is very very important — at least I will not die from malnutrition. I feel so blessed that my CSA has jumped in this year and allowed me to make payments as I can.)

CASHEW/KALE CHEEZE ON TOMATO SLICES

CASHEW/KALE CHEEZE ON TOMATO SLICES

1 large tomato, sliced thickly
1 C cashews, soaked and rinsed
2 C kale, chopped fine
2 – 3 cloves garlic, chopped
1/4 C onion, chopped
1/4 C extra virgin olive oil
Sea salt and pepper to taste

  • In the food processor, process all ingredients, except tomato, to a fine consistency.
  • Sprinkle sea salt and black pepper over tomato slices.
  • Spread kale/cashew cheeze thickly onto tomato slices.

KALE/CASHEW STUFFED TOMATOES – Dinner Tonight

The centerpiece for dinner tonight is going to be kale/cashew-stuffed tomatoes.  This is a recipe that I have made three times already — it was a hit with my room-mate from Day One!   (I am surprised that I haven’t posted it yet, but… better late than never!)   Here it is:

CASHEW/KALE PATE STUFFED TOMATOES
based on a recipe found at naturallivingcuisine.com

2 lg heirloom or beefsteak tomatoes, washed, tops cut off, and center carved out (save for salad or for topping the tomato extravaganza
1 C cashews, soaked and rinsed
2 C kale, chopped fine
2 – 3 cloves garlic, chopped
1/4 C onion, chopped
1/4 C extra virgin olive oil
Sea salt and pepper to taste
1 C fresh parsley for garnish (optional)

Sprinkle inside of tomatoes with salt and pepper, and set aside.
Thoroughly combine remaining ingredients in the food processor and process fine.
Stuff tomatoes with cashew-kale blend.
Garnish with fresh parsley, if desired..

NOTE:You can make this up to 24 hrs. in advance – place in a covered container, or cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate.  Remove from the refrigerator 1 hr. before serving.

The first time I made this, I used one heirloom tomato (they are very large), and I ended up cutting it in half, because we just don’t eat food that heavy in one meal.  The second time, I got an “ugly tomato” — that is what it was called at the market  – it looked pretty much like an heirloom, was cheaper,  and was even larger than an heirloom!  I still cut it in half.  Today,  I just got two beefsteaks, because they were very red.)

When I have made this before,  I have come up with extra kale/cashew pate.  Because I am unreliable when it comes to serving leftovers, I always form patties or balls (depending on what is left-over) and dehydrate them for later. I refrigerate the dehydrated patties or balls for later in the week — this works out well for me, since I work on weekends, and would rather not have to think about what to put in the lunch box.

If you have the choice  between heirlooms and beefsteaks, or other tomatoes,  the heirlooms are actually easier to work with, because their walls tend to be thicker, and the interior is easier to cut out, and less juice tends to pool in the bottom of the hollowed out tomato (in my experience).  If an heirloom is  too large for one serving for you,  you can cut it in half and either share the other half or refrigerate for the next day.

DINNER TONIGHT: BLT Sandwich, Jicama Cheez Fries, and Corn Salad

I worked at dinner again tonight.
I was intrigued by a BLT recipe by David Klein that I had seen, and I wanted to try that.  Then I needed some sides.  I had been wondering what all the hullabaloo about jicama fries was all about, and so I had bought a jicama (it was about the size of a baking potato), and then I made a corn salad to accompany it all.
I decided at the last minute that the fries should be cheez fries, and that the corn salad should have cheez, so I made up a batch of my cashew cheddar cheez.

BLT
1 lg lettuce leaf per pattie
1 C Brazil nuts, soaked and drained
1/2 C sun-dried tomatoes, soaked and drained
sliced tomato
sliced onion

  • In a food processor, process sun-dried tomatoes and Brazil nuts, adding water as needed to make a fine pate.
  • Form 3 patties
  • Spread a little mayonnaise on each leaf.
  • Place each pattie on a lettuce leaf (I used red leaf lettuce).
  • Top with tomato slices, and sliced onion
  • To eat, fold the leaf around the pattie and use hands to eat.


This was my first experience eating a “lettuce sandwich”.  I have steadfastly avoided doing so, and now, I know that, for me, I have been correct in avoiding them (just too messy – not my style).  The next time I make this (soon), I will use it as a thick spread on the sunflower sesame bread, as opposed to a pattie, which would ooze out,  and top it with onions, tomatoes, and sprouts.

CORN SALAD
2 C corn, sliced from cob
1 C tomatoes, chopped
1/4 C onion
1/2 C bell pepper
Chili powder to taste

  • In the food processor, process tomatoes, onion, and bell pepper to a chunky consistency.
  • In a large bowl, combine all ingredients and mix thoroughly.

I drizzled a little cashew cheddar cheez over this salad on the plate, and mixed it in as I ate.

JICAMA FRIES
1 lg jicama, peeled and cut into fry-like strips
1 T olive oil
1/2 t sea salt
1 T chili seasoning

  • Place jicama strips in a large bowl. Add olive oil and mix well to thoroughly coat jicama strips.
  • Sprinkle in salt and chili seasoning and mix to coat jicama strips.

I found the jicama too oily, so I put it in the dehydrator for about 1/2 hr.

I served this with a glob of cheddar cheez on the plate, and dipped the fries in the cheez as I ate them.  This was my first experience with jicama, and I found it quite sweet, almost like an Asian pear.  The fries did not taste like fries to me, but my room-mate and I agreed that they were tasty.

NIBBLES – what I did with the leftovers

Last night, I made spaghetti with zucchini pasta and a tomato/onion/red bell pepper/almond sauce. My sauce came out thick, but I like it that way.

After dinner, I looked at the leftover sauce and just knew I was not oing to eat it this week.  I had a leftover zucchini so I sliced it on the mandonline and then put a spoonful of sauce on each slice and everything in the dehydrator overnight.  This morning, I was amazed at how small the zucchini slices had shrunk, but I was very pleased with the taste of these little bites. My room-mate says they taste like pizza.  Next time, though, I am going to slice the zucchini thicker.

FALSE ALARM!!! you’ve seen it on other raw food news sources!

I held my breath when I heard the story that the FDA was going to force “pasteurization” of organic vegetables. Of course, I was frightened, because of the forced pasteurization of California almonds, which has raised the price of raw almonds through the roof, but I still held off…. I held my breath…. good thing…

Today, I received an email from Dave Klein, the publisher of Living Nutrition Magazine:
“I was wrong about the pasteurization of greens; the FDA
is not, in fact, proposing to pasteurize greens at all! What happened was someone on the rawfoods board posted a thread that read like there was a proposal to pasteurize greens, telling us to protest on the FDA comment line, with a link to the original article. I didn’t read the article.

In fact, the FDA is proposing regulating growers’ practices, which is probably a good thing.

They’re proposing making growers test their produce at certain intervals for contamination. Also they are looking to make certain regulations about soil conditions, which some groups feel will negatively impact organic growers. I would tend to disagree, as I think a lot of ‘organic’ growers today are faking it and need to be regulated. The real organic growers probably have little to hide.”

I have sat out of this scary notification loop because I wanted to see what would really come around. I understand the panic based on California almonds (what were they thinking of… do they really think that pasteurizing almonds will increase almond consumption, as the world continues to go organic and raw????? They just make us go to outside (foreign) sources, which do not have such ignorant laws (unfortunately, almond prices for raw foodists have just gone through the ceiling, as (sensible) foreign sources have realized that they have a limitless market) The main problem for us here (in the US) is that we must trust foreign sources, which are not necessarily under the same regulations as our local regulations.

Perhaps, our “formerly” raw almond growers/producers in California will be able to organize (oh, but it is California!!! they couldn’t organize when the threat was imminent! )

Meanwhile, it looks like we are safe… stay awake… stay aware!!!

DINNER TONIGHT

DINNER TONIGHT

Sorry no specific recipes. I just looked at what I had from the CSA tonight, and what I had left over from last week, with some almonds and dehydrated tomato slices (thanks to the 40 lbs of tomatoes last month!) I had on hand.

I chose:
red kale
several turnip leaves
an onion
a red bell pepper
two Roma tomatoes
1 med. small turnip
1 beet
arugula leaves
1 red lettuce leaf
1/4 clove garlic
@ 1 tomato worth of dried tomato slices, soaked
some almonds
Thai curry paste
sea salt
apple cider vinegar
extra virgin olive oil

I made massaged greens salad with the kale and turnip leaves (see recipe in recipes section), 1/4 onion, all sliced very thin, 1/4 bell pepper minced, a squirt of Thai green curry paste, a sprinkle of sea salt, and a dash of olive oil (extra virgin, of course).

I made a pate with @ 1-1/2 C almonds, 2 Roma tomatoes, the dried tomato slices, 3/4 red bell pepper, 1/2 onion, 1/4 clove garlic, all ground fine in the food processor.

I made a beet/turnip/onion salad with the turnip, the beet, 1/4 onion, and @1/2 tsp. apple cider vinegar. I processed everything fine in the food processor, to the consistency of apple sauce.

Because my room-mate is a foodie, and cares about presentation, I placed the greens neatly on the plate, put three arugula leaves on the plate and flattened two balls of the pate on top of them, and then put 1/2 of the red lettuce leaf on the plate and arranged an interesting drizzle of the beet/turnip/onion salad in the shape of the leaf. She ended up wrapping the pate in the arugula leaves, and the beet/turnip/onion salad in the lettuce. (I ended up copying her wraps, and I wrapped the greens with the pate)

You know… I did not stop to think about food combining tonight. I absolutely did not think about 80/10/10 (because I never do). I know I need some fat and protein, so there were the almonds and the oil (I did consciously think about that). This was a totally “intuitive” meal.


I feel okay, and I am really happy that I had a delicious meal. I do not feel any ill effects, and I am going to save the leftovers and eat them tomorrow at work. I really do not even feel that I need to be giving excuses, although I am, simply so you will not go saying “Oh, but you should have….” Let’s put it this way. I ate a good healthy meal. My body is happy, and I am not having any rash break-outs (that is how my body reacts to wrong eating).
I am full, and I am looking forward to tomorrow, not to the next thing to eat.

RAW REFRIED BEANS

RAW REFRIED BEAN DIP
adapted from a recipe found on livingmom.com

2 C garbanzo bean sprouts
3/4 C hot water
1-1/2 C sunflower seeds, soaked
2/3 C olive oil
2 T Bragg’s Aminos
1 T onion powder
2 T ancho chili powder
1 t garlic powder
1 t cumin powder
1 T nutrional yeast
sea salt to taste

Puree ingredients in Vitamix to very smooth consistency. Add water as needed to achieve desired consistency.

Serve with burritos, or as a dip for vegetables or chips or as a side dish. Alternatively, dehydrate as patties.