Category Archives: MUSHROOMS

Sort-of Southern Barbecue & Cole Slaw – It’s almost close enough!

In the last post, I said I was going to make a Southern style barbecue with a mushroom, and I did.  Here’s what happened:

I laid out my ingredients:

For the cole slaw:

  • Cabbage
  • Onion (that’s how I like my cole slaw)
  • Pepper
  • Olive oil
  • Apple cider vinegar

For the “pulled mushroom barbecue”:

  • A maitake mushroom
  • Eastern North Carolina barbecue sauce (ACV, black pepper, red pepper flakes, hot pepper sauce)

Then I sat in front of the TV and pulled strands of maitake mushroom forever. (Honestly, there must be an easier way!)  At last, I pulled the last strand, and put the mushroom bits in a large plastic bag to marinate with some barbecue sauce.  Set that aside.

I cut half of the head of cabbage and half of the onion, and put them in the food processor (I like my cole slaw in little bits – so much easier and neater to chew!)

Then I mixed up the cabbage with black pepper and just enough oil and vinegar to dampen it but not drown it.

By this time, I was wavering between starving and bereft of appetite for having worked so hard on that maitake.  I decided I was starving, so I ate a delicious bowl of cole slaw.

Then I decided that the maitake really did not need to be so very marinated, and I took some out of the bag, put it in a bowl, put some cole slaw on top, and…… well, it was tasty and filling, and different from my usual fare, and sort of almost like barbecue.  Good enough at that point in time. (in the lead-up to this momentous project, I always known that I would probably need a couple of tries to get it right, but this definitely was better than no barbecue. I mean, it was good enough that I am looking forward to eating the rest of it just as soon as I finish this post.)

YOU STILL HAVE TO EAT

Yesterday, I scored a nice maitake mushroom, 2 lbs of lentils (for sprouts!),  a zucchini, a nice big cabbage, and 2 tomatoes. I think the zucchini and the tomatoes can wait until tomorrow, but I really do want to try to make a pulled mushroom “barbecue” dish, replete with cole slaw tonight. I have a traditional vinegar/spices (no sugar) barbecue sauce to play with.

Meanwhile, I can’t find my sprouter lid for my mason jars, so I’m off to check out a couple of healthy food markets down the avenue.  Somebody should have them, right?

 

POTLUCK: My Dishes Were Hits! (I felt like a star! thank you thank you)

POST #886
So, I went to the potluck last night. As I last reported, I had planned to take mushrooms there.

After I made the mushrooms, I began worrying that there might be some finicky folks there who didn’t want to eat mushrooms, so I put them in the refrigerator, and made up a simple seaweed salad, using a Japanese seaweed mix, carrot shavings, chopped onions, sesame oil, a dash or two of Tabasco, and some apple cider vinegar. That made, I put it in the refrigerator to marinate some. At that point, I became overcome with the idea that nothing but nothing would do but to take the cashew/kale cheese, so I set a cup of cashews to soak and dashed off to the market to pick up a bunch of kale. Yesterday morning, I got up at 5am, and, even before my morning ablutions, I made up the cashew/kale cheese. Then, I decided to take everything to the potluck.

Good thing I did take everything, because it was all a hit. There I was feeling proud as a peacock (as close to a star as I have ever felt)  as people came up to me and asked about how I had made things. (It could have just been that mine was the only real *food* there – most people just brought fruit and dropped it on the table. True, one  young man brought an interesting apple sauce, a Russian guy did make a fabulous apple tart, and his Russian girlfriend made a grim “zucchini pasta dish” that tasted like “earnest health food made by beginner vegetarians”: Please note: Even 30 years ago, before all these designer raw food dishes you find in raw restaurants and recipe books, my dishes were flavorful. Oh! And the woman who’d said that she would bring a kale salad, which was the reason I had not made my famously fabulous marinated kale, picked up a box of chopped kale salad at Whole Foods)

I came away worrying a lot about the raw future of these people, if they don’t even know how to make nice delicious *food* food that will appeal to even non-raw people. (Raw food does not have to taste like you are on a special diet, and it doesn’t even have to taste like a salad!)

RAW FOOD MEET-UP ON SUNDAY – finally decided on marinated mushrooms

POST #885
I’m going to a meet-up raw food potluck on Sunday evening (if you haven’t tried meetup.com, you should! It’s a great way to find other people who are interested in what you are interested in!)

Anyway,when I heard this meet-up potluck was in my neighborhood (sort of — it may end up being a half-hour walk from home), I just had to sign up. Then I had to figure out what to make. Even though my marinated kale is out of this world, I decided not to do it, because kale seems to be everyone’s fall-back. I make crackers (I think I have enough sunflower seeds, and I just got 2lbs of flax seed) and a dip, but I’m feeling broke right about now, and I could be eating those crackers, and, anyway, that does not really sound like a dinner food. So, I’ve decided to make the Korean mushrooms again.
I decided to go to Fairway, where they have a large selection of mushrooms and you can buy them by the pound (as opposed to Costco, where you have to buy a huge box). When I went to Fairway, I saw they had whole baby bellas in a box, but then I noticed that the baby bellas look just like the criminis, and I recalled an article that I’d read that said that they are the same mushrooms, so I got the criminis, because they were cheaper by the pound.
I found sesame oil in the oil section, and then, shortly afterwards, I found more sesame oil, cheaper, but I did not choose that one because, although it said it was sesame oil, it did not list the ingredients (sesame oil), so I wasn’t sure I could trust it for such an important dish as mushrooms for a meetup potluck.
I didn’t buy carrots at Fairway, so I walked a way down Broadway and got some organic carrots at Trader Joe’s (they did not have any kind of sesame oil!)

Now, I’m good to go. I want to make theses mushrooms ahead of time so they can marinate well, and, also, so, if I eat too many of them, I can go make some more fo the potluck!

Of course, me being me, I’d really like to make something that everyone would ooh and aah over.

NEW YEAR, NEW RECIPES: marinated mushrooms, marinated dehydrated mushrooms, cheezy dehydrated broccoli bites, cheezy kale chips,

POST #875
I had big plans for today (editing a book I want to put on Kindle), but, when I finally fell out of bed at 7 a.m. (2 hours later than my usual wake-up time), I went to the kitchen, looked around, thought about what was in the refrigerator that should get used, thought some more about the mushrooms I marinated yesterday, and thought about what I could do with the portobellas and baby portabellas I bought yesterday. On a trip past the dehydrator shelf in the hall, I saw that, in addition to the 2 lbs of cashews I picked up yesterday, I have at least 3 C-worth of cashews on the rack over the dehydrator. Got lemons, jalapenos, bell peppers, onions, garlic, sea salt, and olive oil. So much for the day tied to the computer. I tied on my apron, and started digging around in my recipes.

MARINATED MUSHROOMS: Let’s start with those mushrooms I marinated yesterday. After I had already started pouring oil on them, I realized that I had accidentally picked up flax oil instead of sesame oil. Oh, well, I do like flax oil on salads. We’ll just hope. I added some garlic to try to make a more flavorful mix. Gave mushrooms to the room-mate guinea pig – she liked them even with flax oil. Still, this morning, I wanted that sesame flavor, and so I drizzled about 1 teaspoon of sesame oil (all I had left) over the mushrooms and tossed them well, to distribute the oil. Then, I decided that, since the carrots in my refrigerator were not getting any younger, I should shave some off a carrot and put that in the mushroom mix as well. Did that with the vegetable peeler – really thin, sheer, see-through carrot shavings, and I chopped them into smaller pieces to mix nicely with the mushrooms. Fed that to the room-mate guinea pig, and she liked it even better, and was excited that it looked like the marinated mushrooms that she can buy in her Japanese supermarket.

After I’d done that, I decided I should do something about all of the other “baby bella” mushrooms I had sitting there. I glanced at a couple of recipes I had picked up from other people, and changed a couple of things here and there, and got to work.

First, I removed that stems and set them aside (I use them for “pulled” barbecue), then I sliced the mushrooms about 1/4 inch thick and put them in a large bowl. I ground a small jalapeno in Magic Bullet, then added some extra virgin olive oil, garlic, a little tamari, and some lemon juice, whizzed it again in the Magic Bullet, then poured it over the mushrooms in the bowl, and massaged it in. After that, I put the mushrooms in the dehydrator.

MARINATED DEHYDRATED MUSHROOMS
20 baby bella mushrooms, sliced 1/2 inch thick
3 T extra virgin olive oil
1 small jalapeno, finely minced
1 T garlic powder
1 t tamari (all of the recipes I saw called for much more, but I don’t much care for salt)
2 T lemon juice

Place mushroom slices in a large bowl.
Blend remaining ingredients, then pour over mushrooms in bowl.
With your hands, toss the mushrooms around with the oil mix until all pieces are well coated.
Spread mushroom slices one layer thick on teflex covered dehydrator tray (you could put them directly on the plastic screen, but the teflex is a lot easier to clean up)
Dehydrate for 4-6 hours

I was planning to dehydrated these mushrooms to a jerky consistency, but, after about 4 hours, I tasted them, and turned around and gobbled up about half of them. I decided I should put them in a container in the refrigerator at that point. (Later, when I called Mom to wish her Happy New Year, and I told her about all of the mushrooms, she asked if they tasted like sautéed mushrooms – it has been so long since I have eaten cooked things, I had to think hard – yes, these dehydrated mushrooms taste like well-sauteed mushrooms!) I liked them so much that I sliced up 2 portobellas, cut them into 1-1/2 inch pieces, marinated them, put them right into the dehydrator, so I can have more of these delicious mushrooms.

CHEEZY DEHYDRATED BROCCOLI: I dug some still-okay broccoli out of the refrigerator, and, remembering a recipe from Nouveau Raw I had seen a while back, decided that I could chop it up into about 2 C of florets , toss it with my cheddar cheese, and dehydrate it, so that was the next project. Man! It is really hard to cover broccoli florets completely with sauce. I got it done anyway. They are in the dehydrator as we speak.

CHEEZY KALE CHIPS: I got the idea for the broccoli since I had a lot of kale which needed to be used. (I figured that I could make one batch of the cheddar cheese and use it on the broccoli as well as the kale – it worked, btw). This kale was labeled “young kale.” I’ll say this about “young kale” – it does last longer in the refrigerator, but, if you are going to make kale chips, it is hard to get bite-sized pieces from those small, tightly curled leaves… I got a lot of “crumbs” along the way. Never mind… two trays of chips are in the dehydrator.

KOREAN-STYLE MARINATED MUSHROOMS (of course, raw vegan)

POST #870
Woo hoo!! My room-mate kept bringing home this mushroom dish that I could see and taste was raw. I saw the price on the pot and decided that I could make a “reliable” (as in, I know exactly what is in there– duh! I read the ingredients!) version. Last night, I took some of the “baby ‘bellas’” I had in the refrigerator, and sliced them up thinly, put them in a bowl, sprinkled them VERY lightly with salt (ha! You’re seeing that I actually can use salt when forced to!), and added some sesame oil and sesame seeds.
I tried the mushrooms last night, right after I’d made them, and believed they tasted good. I put them in the refrigerator. Believing that my Japanese room-mate has a different “taste”, I fed the mushrooms to her tonight, and she said that they taste much better than the store-bought ones. I was happy.

Okay, I’ll share with you exactly what I did (the measurements are approximate)

  • 6 large baby bella mushrooms
  • 2 T sesame oil
  • 1 t sesame seeds (or more, to taste)
  • 1/8 C carrot (sliced paper thin)
  • Sprinkle of sea salt
  • Remove the stems of the mushrooms (save them for something else – chopped into salad, blended into soup, or shredded for another mushroom recipe)
  • Slice the mushrooms thinly- @1/8” (I used the wider width on my adjustable mandolin, but when I came too close to the ends, I sliced the mushroom ends by hand with a very sharp knife)
  • Place sliced mushrooms in a large bowl.
  • Lightly sprinkle on sea salt, and toss, to mix.
  • Add sesame oil and sesame seeds and toss to thoroughly mix (you can see when the mushrooms are coated with the oil.
  • Wait.

I did not make my experiment with the carrot, but they were in the Korean version I was copying – they will likely add a sweet note to the dish)

I tasted these about 30 mins after I made them and they were good.
After they had been in the refrigerator for 1 day, I gave them to the room-mate. She said they were better than the “Korean-style” ones from the Japanese market. (That is all I needed to hear)

OPENING CEREMONY: You can’t always get what you want

POST #867
OPENING CEREMONY this afternoon.

IT’S A GO!
The cranberry sauce I made from the cranberry pulp left over after I made cranberry juice came out very well.  I tried a spoonful, then spooned out about a cup on the plate and inhaled it. Yumm!  This stuff is too good to share. It’s mine, all mine!  I’ll make some more as soon as I get some oranges.

The butternut squash came out rather spicy, but, mixed with my fresh lentil sprouts, it was delicious.  I’ll use it as an ingredient, not as a dish on its own, and the next time I make it, I will go a lot easier on the jalapenos.  It is good enough that I’ll mix it with lentil sprouts and take it to a potluck party this coming weekend.

The sauerkraut is good, but somehow I made it too salty. How did I do that? No clue – I am very parsimonious with salt.  I am going to leave it another week to see if it gets better.  It is still good, just saltier than I would like it to be.

Mmmm.  Well, this is the first time I have opened up stuff that I haven’t absolutely loved right off the bat.  Actually, this is the first time I have made any foodstuff that I did not like. (I guess it had to happen sooner or later.)

I’M BLUE
The cranberry sauce that I made from the recipe I got from a book was not the best stuff I have ever eaten.  For some reason, it lost all its color, and had little taste. I’m not even sure there is anything I can do with it, other than throw it out.

 This is the first time I tried fermenting mushrooms, and it will be the last. First, the mushrooms really do shrink down to very little. That wouldn’t be a problem if I like the texture or the taste.  I did a jar of portobellos and a jar of criminis, and I didn’t like either.  I’ll probably stick these in some soup where they might hide from me. 

MY THANKSGIVING & BLACK FRIDAY

POST #865
On Wednesday night, I dehydrated some maitake mushrooms (I made them up in the marinade I usually use when I am going to use mushrooms as a meal inclusion – 1/4 C olive oil/1/4 C tamari – I won’t do that again – the mushrooms get smaller but the tamari doesn’t—maybe next time 1 T tamari) Still, they are not that bad, and people who like salt like them.

I didn’t feel like making Thanksgiving dinner yesterday. My room-mate is moving out after 12 years (no, not like that, and I am very happy that she has found a job at the University of Michigan, in Ann Arbor, Michigan, after getting fired for being culturally incompatible with her boss), and I felt I needed to clean the kitchen (her job, which she hasn’t ever done). So, there I was on hands and knees, with my buddy Mr. Clean, scrubbing with a heavy duty sponge (a scrub brush wouldn’t do enough. Actually, I am feeling like I am in that Kafka story where the guy cannot clean enough – every time I turn around, there is grime!)

I’ll confess – I don’t like to work hard, and I can come up with a couple of thousand things to do that would be also useful.

SO…. I now have a jar of cranberry-orange relish fermenting, another jar of jalapeno sauerkraut, and a jar of mushrooms (wow! They really do shrink down! That jar was packed full yesterday!), and a jar of garlic/jalapeno squash working.
This morning, I got up to scrub the kitchen some more (you can’t imagine!). I was supposed to go to the Union Square Holiday Bazaar with a friend at 10, but she bowed out, so I stopped to juice some cranberries (woo! tres tart!) which I mixed with half again as much apple cider (still tart, but I liked it).

I went to Union Square, and looked around (most of the things I looked at would be good for my 25-year-old niece, but I have to get her take on colors and other stuff ; she is very different from the way I was at 25—yes, I do remember!). Then I went across the street and looked, for maybe 10 minutes, in DSW, but I couldn’t get past the rudeness of people who would stop in rafts across the wide aisles and not let me past, so I left, and took a cross-town bus to Sixth Ave. in Greenwich Village. There, I went into the LifeThyme organic store in search of Zukay salad dressings (Zukay’s answer to my inquiry as to where I could buy their salad dressing had assured me that LifeThyme carried them – WRONG!). No problem! Right next to LifeThyme is Bigelow’s Pharmacy, which carries an amazing assortment of essential oils, as well as homeopathic remedies.

Then I went to the Barnes & Noble which has always been there on the corner (but which, I learned today, is leaving the Village on 12/31/12), to see if they had anything I wanted to buy with the gift card I got for my birthday (no go! Maybe because they are going out of business? I’ll have to check out the Union Square location for raw recipe books—what if there are no more bookstores? How will we be able to look at books and decide if we want them?) I did find some interesting books for someone I know (can’t say here… she might be following my blog or something)

Anyway, I am headed for the kitchen again now. I am going to try using the pulp from the 3 C of cranberries, which I used to make the1/2 C of cranberry juice, to make some more cranberry/orange sauce (I expect I will need to add some more cranberries to fill the jar).

If the portobella mushrooms I have in the refrigerator are still viable, I am going to put those to ferment also.
If I have time, I will put up some carrots with ginger, garlic, and dill.

ADVERSE EFFECT FROM RAW SHIITAKE MUSHROOMS?

POST #811
Have you heard of this?

I’ve used raw shiitake mushrooms in my food preparations for a number of years now (I do marinate my shiitakes in soy sauce and oil before I use them).  I have never had an issue with them.

A while back, however, it was reported that uncooked shiitake could have a toxic effect.

Uncooked shiitake have a starch-like substance, lentinan, which is used as an anti-cancer agent.  Sloan Kettering research showed the protein in lentinan, lentin, has anti-fungal properties, reduces the growth of leukemia cess, and suppresses HIV viral enzyme activity.

The lentinan, which is only broken down by cooking, and can apparently cause some people to have a toxic reaction to it.

This is not going to stop me from using shiitake, because I have never had an issue with them, and I like the health producing qualities they have.  Perhaps the marination in soy sauce prevents the problem – I don’t know.  I just know that I eat up to a quarter-pound of shiitake mushrooms a month because I like them quite a bit, and I can get them at a reasonable price.

6/28/12 CSA SHARE DISTRIBUTION #5

 POST #758

Here is what we got and what I came home with:

Zucchini – 4 pcs
Cipollini Onions – 1 bun
Fennel -OR- Kohlrabi – 1 bun…We got broccoli instead, I traded for more kale
Baby Spinach – 1 bag
Radicchio – 1 hd
Swiss Chard – 1 bun………………I traded for more kale
Toscano Kale – 1 bun
Red Boston Lettuce – 1 hd…..…We got a HUGE bunch of escarole instead

I traded the broccoli because it was mostly yellow, and I don’t care for broccoli that much anyway.

I kept the radicchio because I have never eaten radicchio, and I can’t know if I don’t like it until I try it.  Wish me luck.

I was going to trade the onions for something, but they are so nice and big – I have some store-bought onions, which will last for a while, but these nice fat onions will be good in salads for the next week, I think.

I just made it through last week’s escarole (gasp!), and now I’m saddled with more.  Oh well. Wraps worked last week, I can deal with a salad or two, and then, of course, there are (yuck) green smoothies.  (I was just checking my skin today to see if I have turned green from all the green smoothies occasioned by the farms insidious desire for me to consume green leaves.)

I will be up by Fairway market tomorrow afternoon, so I will stop in there and pick up some cabbage (I’m out of sauerkraut), tomatoes, mushrooms (I want to make a cashew/jalapeno/mushroom cheeze filling for kohlrabi ravioli with the kohlrabi I still have left), and some more lentils to sprout (I really do love lentil sprouts)

BTW, last week, I bought this bag of sprouting grass for the cats from the supermarket, and it turned out to be wheat mixed with vermiculite.  I opened the bag wrong, so I ended up putting a paper towel in my old Kitchen Garden sprouter.  I have never seen wheat sprout that fast!  It grew to be short grass (standing up and everything) in 2 days.  I watered it twice a day for about 5 days, then set it out for the cats, who would have nothing to do with it – oh well, I guess they are not into healthy food.  Meanwhile, I saw it was so easy, I am thinking about growing wheat grass for me (mind you, I am still in the thinking stage. I could probably put a window box inside the kitchen window – our only window that gets sun).

It’s really hot here, but, I’m happy to say that my last living fan (2 died over the winter) is cooling my room off nicely.  Yea!